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Barefoot in "The Deabateable Lands"

Discussion in 'Pipes' started by Falconeer, Jul 16, 2010.

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  1. Falconeer

    Falconeer Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2009
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    Old Peter Peinaar

    Old Peter crops up quite a lot in John Buchan's Richard Hannay stories – he's mentioned in “The 39 Steps” plays a large part in my favourite story “Greenmantle” and gets killed of in “Mr. Standfast.”

    Hannay had been a mining engineer in colonial Africa but when he was younger had done a lot of hunting big game and trekking in the veldt.

    Peter, who was of Boer extraction, taught Hannay all he knew about veldtcaft and had been quite a character when he was younger – illicit diamond buyer, smuggler, prospector, soldier of fortune, ranoncteur with a fondness for the “Golden Gargle” and prone to saying what he thought which got him into bar room brawls from time to time, and on one occasion led to him shooting out the lights in a back country saloon. In other words he was the kind of guy you'd love to have had as a pal in those days.

    O course he was a fictional character, but it's been my great fortune in life to have been “taken under the wing” of some quite remarkable characters. These people have adopted me, shared their time knowledge and skills selflessly with me and taught me a great deal; I am deeply in their debt.

    I tend to think of “Peter Peinaar” as summarising these guys.

    Of his pipe we are told, that he cherished it, it was large and had been carved for him by another Old Reprobate by the name of Jannie Grobelaar down in St Helena. He smoked strong rough cut Boer tobacco just out of the curing shed in it. When he was undercover in Germany in WW 1 the pipe looked sufficiently German/Continental for it to attract no notice in a country where the norm was at that time to smoke large bent carved pipes.

    When I saw Sas's “Kings Billiard” it spoke to me, and to my mind was very much the kind of pipe Old Peter would have smoked, so I simply had to grab it.

    O.K. enough of the trip down Memory Lane – cutting to the action, after a week how has it gone?

    Well here's the words of the man who made it: -

    "As for sort of smoking itself at a certain unflappable pace, I find that big pipes do that, and that's why I'm so fond of them. It's not to say I can't get a good smoke of a small bowl, but the "zone" for a big pipe is a mile wide, and an hour long. They get up to operating temperature, and then just cruise along with no effort at all (if they're built right). It isn't necessarily right for all occassions, but if you've got a couple hours... what could be nicer?

    I can't add much. I smoked a bowl of 5 Brothers first to condition it and then went straight over to Quadruple Virginia. No “new pipe” taste, no gurgles, no problems. Just to see how it would handle a moister tobacco, I put a full bowl of Peterson's “Sunset Breeze” and it smoked it perfectly to the very end.

    My other Sas pipe is an oil treated. There is a subtle difference to me in their smoking properties; the Peinaar offers what I can only describe as a “harder” smoking taste sensation – not harsher and not at all unpleasant I should add, just different.

    For me the perfect tobacco in this pipe is one with some cigar leaf in it and that's what it'll be dedicated to.

    The pipe does have a certain hypnotic quality to it – you can get mesmerised watching the smoke whirl then curl lazily out of the bowl, you can get lost in admiring the grain patterns or the crown effect as viewed from different angles and you can find your fingers or thumb idly caressing the part rustication.

    Guess you could say I'm impressed. How much?

    Well you know my theory – a man needs at least three pipes of a type to rotate and rest; I've dug deep into my sporran and asked the Big Fella to make me a third to be called “Falconeer's Rhona” - a Scotsman can't pay anything a finer tribute than to part with his bawbees! Might even at my next birthday get the nickel band on the Peinaar replaced with a silver one.........

    Best to all,

    Gerry
     
  2. Falconeer

    Falconeer Active Member

    Joined:
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    Sorry forgot the pix

    Gerry
     
  3. Dondi

    Dondi Active Member

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    I must say, well-named indeed! [​IMG]
     
  4. Rider

    Rider Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2010
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    i would threaten to steal it off you but that would be like kidnapping :)

    im happy to hear it means so much to you and that was a great story describing what it reminds you of. hope you enjoy for many years to come

    ;)
     
  5. Sasquatch

    Sasquatch Sales Account

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2009
    Messages:
    8,225
    He DIES in Mr Standfast??? OH great... thanks a lot.


    :xd:
     
  6. Falconeer

    Falconeer Active Member

    Joined:
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    He Was Mr. Standfast! He'd to shave off his beard and dye his hair to get into the Royal Flying Corps, became an Ace and shot down the German Ace - c'mon what more else could a man do, and that with a Gammy Leg!!

    Best

    Gerry
     
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