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Certain styles for certain tobacco types

Discussion in 'Pipes' started by JP UK, Aug 4, 2013.

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  1. JP UK

    JP UK Member

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    Evening all,

    Having spent a couple of months reading forums and watching youtubers, I've noticed a pattern emerge.

    Quite a few people seem to believe that a certain tobacco type smokes better in a particular style of pipe. For example I've heard a number of people say that a long shanked pipe (lovat, canadian etc) will smoke english style tobaccos well.

    I was wondering as a clueless noob, is there any hard and fast pattern to this? Are there any pipe styles that the membership here would avoid when taking on a certain tobacco?
     
  2. ruffinogold

    ruffinogold Ruffinogold-Mayor, I.R.G.E.--At Large. Mayor

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    I do like burley in a cob very much , though I like burley in anything . Sometimes you can smoke a blend and it will pop in a certain pipe ! You look at the pipe and see it's a medium sized Dublin [ for example ] . Does that mean the blend will pop in medium Dublins .... no . It just means it popped for you in yer Dublin and that could be because the pipe rocked or you just had a bliss smoke or whatever . However , there are certain blends that I prefer a certain size pipe . Ogdens Walnut , for example , smokes super slow for me so I smoke it in smaller bowls unless I have 4 hours to smoke in a large bowl . I also like a ribbon cut blend in a medium or bigger bowl because it just seems easier to fill correctly . It's things like that , that are personal , that may make a difference , but they're in ones own realm and have not much to do with the whole world
     
  3. JP UK

    JP UK Member

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    Interesting, so there may be some sense to the theories, its mainly down to choice and preference?
     
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  4. ruffinogold

    ruffinogold Ruffinogold-Mayor, I.R.G.E.--At Large. Mayor

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    Yes , I think so . Add to the choice and preference each individuals pipes , which are unique to themselves . I don't believe a certain style tobacco excels in a certain style pipe across the board . The Burley and Cob combo does have a " Mojo " to it and it's very sweet ! I have favorite combos but that's within my collection .
     
  5. JP UK

    JP UK Member

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    Sure, so probably best not to rush out to buy a type of pipe for a type of tobacco...although it does make for an awesome excuse (in my head at least):byg:
     
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  6. ruffinogold

    ruffinogold Ruffinogold-Mayor, I.R.G.E.--At Large. Mayor

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    Lol ... whatever brings in a new pipe is the way to go !!
     
  7. Texhealer

    Texhealer Active Member

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    I have some pretty strong opinions on bowl size for different tobaccos but at the end of the day they truly are just my opinion, and what works well for me.

    I will make an exception on the burley in a cob beliefs. I think there is an interaction with the burley tobacco and the cob in the pipe that go together well and make it more than just my opinion.
     
    Joe Ahearn likes this.
  8. Tate

    Tate Member

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    You guys are too hung up on pointing out that everything is only your opinion. Just say what your take on it is without fluffing everything up about how it is only your take! Jeez, I expected it out of the mayor (he is a politician, right?), but it is growing more rampant!

    Now... On top pipe shape/sizes for blends. I think there is def truth to the idea that certain blends work better in certain shapes. There is science behind it too. Take for instance the conical dublin bowl vs a big flat bottomed pot shaped pipe. In the dublin the smoke is all concentrating to a single point in the bottom where in the pot, the air flow is much different. This can influence the flavor, burn rate, and total area of the burn line. This idea that the total area of burn line is important. Take for instance...

    Lets say we rolled two cigars of the same exact blend one with a small ring gauge and one with a big ring gauge. There flavors will be different, even if the wrapper leaf is the same as the filler.

    I find that latakia and oriental tobaccos develop a more rich and full flavor in a larger pot style bowl. They seem to profit the most from this expansion of area to burn in. Very spicy and sharp blends like vapers tend to do excellent in a smaller bowl and I like them in cone shaped bowls. The flavor is already very concentrated and as the bowl winds down it can taper off without overwhelming or becoming bitter. The smaller bowl also gives you some leeway to keep the smoke cooler because VA will smoke hot.

    After you smoke for a long while you can start to notice how these bowl shapes will affect different tobaccos flavor profiles, heat levels, etc. Then you can take a blend you are familiar with and ask... "Will it benefit from these different style bowls based on what I'm looking to get out of it?" And the answer is often yes.

    A case in point for me is Carter Hall which I find a lack luster blend. I smoked it for quite some time in my small thin stove pipe shaped pipes I use in my truck since it was easy burning. I never got much flavor out of it. It was just too shallow a flavor profile. So one day when about to smoke a Latakia I was saying to myself... "Pick out one of those wide mouth pipes to enrich that earthy flavor.." when a light bulb came on... Enrich and deepen a flavor... Carter Hall needs more depth.... So I started smoking it in a very wide pipe and bingo... It got a lot better for me. So you see you can use some of what you know about the smoking characteristics of certain blends and pipe styles to marry them for your needs.
     
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  9. jpberg

    jpberg Moderator Moderator

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    Okay, here's my take. Science my ass. Until someone shows me a btu chart comparing a Dublin v. a pot, or whatever, I call horsehockey. Learn how to smoke "x" tobacco in "x" pipe. It takes time, but ultimately, you will smoke whatever blend in whatever pipe, and enjoy it immensely.
     
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  10. Tate

    Tate Member

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    So what I'm hearing is that we're going to have to break out the thermistors again so Dwaugh's wife will quiet down.
     
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  11. jpberg

    jpberg Moderator Moderator

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    Zactly.
     
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  12. Texhealer

    Texhealer Active Member

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    Well until recently I felt the same way you do, Va's in a Dublin, English in a pot shape, and felt like that was carved in stone. Then (admittedly at the Mayors suggestion ) I tried a couple of Va's in larger more "English" type pipes and got an absolutely fine smoke out of them. Leading me to believe that it probably was just my opinion all along.
     
  13. Tate

    Tate Member

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    The idea is not that it is a rule, but that different pipe shapes can do different things to flavors and heat of a tobacco. Some Va/pers benefit from getting more depth out of them while others do not (which is a matter of personal taste). For instance I prefer Irish Flake in a narrow bowl while I prefer Kajun Kake in a medium bowl.
     
  14. dwaugh

    dwaugh Moderator Moderator

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    At they very least, given two pipes with equal size airways leading up to the bowl, the larger diameter bowl will have a much lower velocity for a given puff. So if you smoked two pipes at the same suckage (not a word) power, the tobacco would see fairly different velocities of air flow.
     
  15. Russell Hartman

    Russell Hartman Stay Silver

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    WOW---Dwaugh--a new non-existant word for my vocabulary (in which by the way I really-really love).
    Suckage--#1--An unmeasurable amount of force exzerted when drawing or puffing on a pipe.
    #2--the excessive moisture build up in the bottom of a pipe or in its' stem that gurgles and tastes funny.
    Suck-ee--A person or one who is in the act of performing suckage.
    :xd::laff::haha::rofl:
     
  16. cigrmaster

    cigrmaster Member

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    I smoke flakes exclusively and buy my pipes based on that fact. I buy group 4-5 sizes and shapes like Dublins , Apples, Rhodesians, Biliards and Lovats. I have found over the years that this system works best for my tastes. I have tried flakes in larger pipes and found the flavors to be not as good. I also like a pipe that has a bowl width no greater than 13/16. I tried smoking flakes in a pot with a 1" bowl width and did not enjoy it. When I did smoke English blends I did enjoy larger pipes like group 6 and ODA's. For my tastes the complexities of the different components shined in larger pipes. People need to find out what works best for them, there are no hard and fast rules to any of this.
     
  17. BradNTX

    BradNTX Well-Known Member

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    • I love Burley in a cob, and have not found a briar or meer that matches the flavor.
    • I feel the same for Virginia or VaPer in a briar.
    • Tall narrow bowls seem to produce the best results for folding and stuffing a flake without rubbing it out.
    • Large conical bowls work great for the cannonball.
    • Dedicating a pipe to a favorite blend can produce superior results in flavor.

    Those are my general thoughts, but matching a pipe to tobacco is sometimes unpredictable. I bought a Rad Davis hickory nut a little over a year ago with the intention of finding a killer briar that would burn Burley. It didn't. Not only that, some of my favorite Virginia's didn't taste that great in it either. I smoked Briar Fox from C&D in several pipes and thought the flavor mediocre at best. On a whim I put it in the Rad Davis, and it blew my mind with earthy, smoky goodness. Now that pipe is dedicated to Briar Fox.

    Some tobaccos taste better in a larger pipe, but for no explainable reason. I find this the case with Peterson Irish Oak. I smoked a few bowls in a variety of small to medium pipes and liked it, but nothing mind blowing. I tried it in a huge Wiley freehand, and was super surprised at the nuances in flavor, and subtle sweet spiciness. Now I have a Pete XL14 dedicated to Irish Oak and it is one of my favorites.

    I have a pipe that makes any Lat blend taste better than the others I've tried. Not sure why, but nothing matches my experience as that little Neerup pot for Lat.

    Pipes and tobaccos provide a unique experience that other tobacco like cigars can't. Its enjoyable to find combinations that work, methods that appeal to you, and discover new things that make smoking that much better. Be open minded to a degree, and try different stuff, it will pay off in time.

    :bing:
     
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