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Estate Shop Pipes

Discussion in 'Pipes' started by RTOdhner, May 4, 2011.

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  1. RTOdhner

    RTOdhner Well-Known Member

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    I picked up two pipes today at an estate shop, and I'm in the process of cleaning them up. One is a Comoy Guildhall #594 bent Billiard (about a 1/4 bend I guess) that looks almost like a Cutty but without the the nub at the base of the bowl; it has three silver lines at the base of the stem. The other is a Ben Wade Burrsbury #6, which looks like a kinda sorta cross between a Zulu and Rhodesian. Does anybody know when these particular lines of pipes were in production?
     
  2. WillH

    WillH Active Member

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    Nope! can't help at all. Just wanted to say, "You are lucky"!

    Everytime I've visited an estate sale ( darn few) or an antique shop (darn few) all I find is pure crap! I read about all the neat pipes you guys dig out of estates and antique shops an wonder - how the heck do they get so lucky!

    Saw a beat up ole' Falcon in one shop awhile back! Now that I look back on that experience I figure I was the sucker on the day of that deal! Paid way too much for the pipe and ended up giving the Falcon to a friend - lost the friend because he now hates me for giving him such an evil, vile pipe!:(

    Yulp! You are indeed lucky!

    Will
     
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  3. Marc

    Marc Active Member

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    You're too funny Will... :haha:
     
  4. RTOdhner

    RTOdhner Well-Known Member

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    I had to dig through a crap load of run-down, over-priced Grabows and Kaywoodies to find these. That being said, the digging is worth the effort. I think that some of the older Grabows and Kaywoodies are very good pipes, especially if you can find the ones made in the 1950's and 1960's. So, you may go through 10 nasty Grabows before you find a good one. You'll often find private label pipes - pipes made as promotionals for long gone pipe shops and such. These are also very good pipes, and make for some interesting history. You'll even find major brand pipes and their seconds if you look through enough shops enough times.

    The trick is to look frequently, because antique and estate shop merchandise can be pretty fluid and it moves in and out quickly sometimes. Another trick is to have a decent magnifying glass, so you can really check out the grain. Also bring along a good cotton sock or t-shirt, because quite often these pipes are covered with a layer or two of dust and grime that can hide a really nice pipe - and even a cursory wipe-down can reveal some gems. These two I found today ran me less than $20 each. Comoy and Ben Wade may not be top of the line $500+ pipes, but they're good pipes none-the-less. You can barely buy a new Grabow for under $20 these days - and these are superior to the average Grabow.

    Another thing you'll often find is pipe racks. Most of the ones I've seen so far have been two-to-five pipe Decatur pipe racks and they average about $10, which is a darn good bargain in my book. I even picked up a Decatur 20 pipe wall cabinet unit that has two racks that hold seven pipes each, a storage drawer up top for pipe tools and such, a cabinet down below that is handy for holding tinned baccy, and inside each cabinet door is a rack to hang three pipes. The whole thing ran me $45.

    I say it's worth the work involved, because some real gems can be found for very little money and just a moderate amount of effort.
     
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  5. ichabod

    ichabod Member

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    I can't really help in identifying anything about your new pipes but wanted to say congrats, that sounds like an awesome find!

    Can we see some pictures?

    Also I wanted to say...

    Agreed about the antique shops!!

    Just look and look often. You have to really hunt for them sometimes. All the pipes that I have found have not been out in the open really. It's actually fun to me. Maybe I'm weird but I like going into antique shops anyway. That's how I bought my first couple pipes before I even smoked them. One turned out to be...from what I have gathered, a peterson system second, branded "erica." I've found a pipe that was made for the oldest tobacconist in Washington DC and a calabresi.

    I have yet to pay over $10 for a single pipe and have also found two racks, one was 15 the other was an all-in-one deal with a rack and three pipes, a really cool hardcastle a nice emperor and a dunhill, for 25. Even found an old nimrod lighter once too.

    Just go to a lot of shops, if you can't find what you're looking for ask, they may know where some are hidden away. If there is a small town near you take a day on the weekend and visit, there are usually tons of antique shops in those smaller old towns that never seem to have grown.

    You really never know what you may find, I will buy non-pipe stuff to, if I come across old fedoras I will snatch them up, pretty cheap too...found a royal stetson whippet in perfect condition once for 15! I find old cameras cheap, old leather goods (luggage and such), I don't know, I just like older things.
     
  6. RTOdhner

    RTOdhner Well-Known Member

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    As soon as I can find my camera cable, I'm going to try to post some photos.

    I love antique/estate shops, because like you said you never know what you'll find. I've bought four nice pipes, a pipe rack, and a plate for rubbing-out flake tobacco (a collectible plate w/a Norman Rockwell print of an old sailor smoking a pipe as he builds a model boat for his grandson). I've got my eye on a couple of different curio cabinets for all my pipes and baccies

    The house that I live in was built in 1919. The wife and I am slowly furnishing it with antiques from the 1920's to 1940's, or top-quality reproductions of furnishings from that period. Most of the stuff we've gotten thus far has been from antique/estate shops.

    The items you've acquired sound great, especially the pipe from the DC tobacco shop - a lot of history there. I collect Pete's, so that system second also sounds really nice. I'm like you in that I like older things. I don't know why, maybe it's the higher level of craftsmanship and a longing for a time when the world seemed bigger, safer/happier, and cleaner.
     
  7. nowsharing

    nowsharing Member

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  8. ichabod

    ichabod Member

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    Your house sounds exactly what my wife and I want to do. We would love to find a victorian era house and furnish it with antique furniture, not necessarily victorian furniture throughout though.

    There are some pictures up around here of the DC pipe, I started a thread asking for help identifying a pipe, I think a search for "curtis draper" here should bring you to it. The peterson second, I actually put a crummy cell phone picture of it up in a thread I started about dunhill nightcap if you wanted to see that one also.

    I have to agree with you, I think it's the nostalgia, the craftsmanship, the entire idea of having something older that has lasted...when it seems today that everything is made to be temporary, quick, throw away etc, really flashy...I like the subtle things, the small things in the details that just don't seem to be there anymore. The stuff you have to actually take a moment to stop and admire. About life in general in those times, I can't speak from experience but just having heard others describe them, things seem...I don't know how to explain it, maybe slower? I sometimes wish life would slow down a bit, everything seems to be rush rush now....perhaps that's one of the reasons I took up pipe smoking, you can't rush it, it forces you to stop, slow down and just relax.

    Now, I don't mean to hassle, and I can't speak for everyone, but I would still really like to see the photos of your new pipes.
     
  9. Jomodeere

    Jomodeere Member

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    Wow those are some good deals you guys got! The only antique shop here in my town doesn't price their pipes. Whenever someone is interested in one and asks how much it is the lady goes to the computer and finds the highest priced on on ebay and marks that price on it. Its a load of crap is what it is. She tried to sell a vintage kaywoodie to me for $125. I just laughed in her face and told her it wasn't worth more than ten.

    She then tried to sell it to me for $100. Crazy people in this world.

    Jomo
     
  10. RTOdhner

    RTOdhner Well-Known Member

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    Need the cable for the camera, so I can down-load. If I can't find it here pretty soon, I'll have to get one. Probably tomorrow.

    I don't think the pipe slows you down, I think people who enjoy moving slow are drawn to pipes. The pipe just helps to keep us there... or more specifically, the tobacco. Virginia blends, I think in particular, are best sipped very slowly because I find that there are so many nuances to them and they'd be missed if I smoke them too fast.

    Smoking a pipe is not a ten minute affair or a cheap nicotine hit, like a cigarette. Heck, it takes me ten minutes just to rub out my flake toby. A pipe is a good 30 - 60 minute commitment, and then the Vitamin N fix is going to be much less than in a Marlborough or something like that. I'm afraid that just doesn't appeal to the masses, who seem to be into short-term commitments and instant gratification.

    I'd have to say that most pipe smokers have an eye for aesthetics, because our pipes are themselves works of art and our tobacco blends are culinary works of art, often sold in tins that are also works of art. I think it's only natural that we carry this over to a love of fine art and fine craftsmanship in general. (I'd have to say that cigar smokers could also make a similar claim).

    And speaking of slowing down and relaxing, time for a bowl of Old Dublin. Later...
     
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