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Help with pipe identification

Discussion in 'Pipes' started by ichabod, Apr 4, 2011.

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  1. ichabod

    ichabod Member

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    So, I came across a poker shaped pipe in an antique shop. It looked really nice, clean and was only $5 so i bought it. The stem needs to be addressed, from what I have read I am guessing it is vulcanite and has oxidized.

    Anyway, it is stamped "Curtis Draper" and I can not find anything anywhere about Curtis Draper pipes. I have found a W. Curtis Draper Tobacconist located in Washington DC & Bethesda MD that has been around since 1887, but nothing about them producing any pipes. I can't find any email address to try and contact anyone so...

    I am guessing it has to have something to do with them, but I'm not 100% certain.

    I guess I am just curious, I think I would most like to know the age of this pipe really. Also, IF it is from there I want to know the story of how it ended up in a small East Texas town...but the only way to know that would be to contact the original owner, oh well.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. nesta

    nesta Well-Known Member

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    Interesting, I like the grain on that a lot! I went to W. Curtis Draper's website and also could not find an email address, but both locations have a telephone number provided, and perhaps one of the staff members would be able to help with your question or else give you the email address/phone number of someone who could help. It seems the business has changed hands, so if the pipe is old enough perhaps the current owners would be unaware of any history of pipes made specifically for the company. Another possibility is to get in touch with them on some social networking site such as facebook or twitter, both of which they seem to use.
     
  3. ichabod

    ichabod Member

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    Good call with the social networking sites! I hadn't thought of that.

    I did notice the numbers but was hesitant in calling, I just imagined getting a lower level employee on the line who wouldn't know...and seeing as how it has changed ownership several times some of the higher ups might not even know.

    I will try and track them down on facebook and see what can be found out.

    And the grain is very nice! The picture doesn't really do it justice at all, I took it with my phone since it was handy at the time.
     
  4. BradNTX

    BradNTX Well-Known Member

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    I don't know anything about Curtis Draper, but that is one fiiiiine looking pipe! I like it! :thumb:
     
  5. nesta

    nesta Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I'd definitely have purchased it if I saw it, and I even hate pokers in general. Love that one though...when you get to give it a go, let us know how it smokes!
     
  6. Beale

    Beale Active Member

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    I love the finish on that pipe! Why is it called a "poker shaped" pipe? Just trying to learn, Beale.
     
  7. jhe888

    jhe888 Member

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    I don't know why that shape is called a poker, but a cylindrical bowl joined to a cylindrical stem up from the bottom is, sure enough, a poker.

    I would guess (and it is purely a guess) that the pipe shop had pipes made elsewhere marked with their name. Quality on such pipes varied a lot, but you wouldn't generally expect wood that nice to be on a junky pipe.

    Let us know how it smokes.

    Hard to go wrong for $5.
     
  8. BradNTX

    BradNTX Well-Known Member

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    You know, some pipe shapes are obvious, because of a shape name as the descriptor. Others are harder to figure out. I was curious as to what was on the net about the origins/history of pipe shapes & really didn't find much of anything.

    It would be a cool project maybe? Hmmm... what if different members volunteered to research a shape of pipe & then a list of the findings were compiled? Sorry, it just popped in my head. :whistle:
     
  9. ichabod

    ichabod Member

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    I'm game! I don't have a lot of free time lately but it sounds fun actually...I'm a nerd and like researching random things.
     
  10. YOJiMBO20

    YOJiMBO20 Member

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    I always assumed it was called a poker because of the part at the bottom that "pokes out" from below the stem.

    That, or they would come in handy in a poker game when you may need to set the pipe down and don't have a stand.
     
  11. Bri2k

    Bri2k Active Member

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    We have a winner! Give that man a cigar, er um a pipe!
     
  12. t-bear

    t-bear Well-Known Member

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    That poker has some stunning grain...I'm a birds-eye ho'. I would guess that the pipe was made specifically for the shop. Many tobacconists did this "in the day" as a promotional item. Well found...especially for the price!
     
  13. RTOdhner

    RTOdhner Well-Known Member

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    Fine pipe. I'm also going to opine that it was a promotional pipe put out by a B&M back in the distant past. I have a Seal's pipe that I'm guessing was a private label pipe made by Kaywoodie for a now defunct pipe shop. It's a pot style pipe, nice grain, and beautiful rich walnut finish.

    I like to cruise the antique/estate sale shops and look for such pipes. It takes me back to a time when pipe shops were much more common, people seemed less hostile, and world seemed less crowded.
     
  14. ichabod

    ichabod Member

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    Well, so far nothing has come about. I think I am going to just try and call and ask to speak to a manager then explain the situation and see if they know any of the history of their shop and such and if not see if they can point me towards someone who might.


    Oh, I do this all the time. My wife and I can spend entire weekends browsing antique shops. Can't say it's because it reminds me of a certain time from experience as I am only 31, but we appreciate the older things. In fact, just the other day I stopped by a shop and picked up an old (maybe 50's) royal stetson open road fedora...and it fit!
     
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