How long do you let aromatics dry out for?

Discussion in 'Pipe Tobacco' started by brunchman, Jul 23, 2012.

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  1. brunchman

    brunchman Member

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    Just wondering, how long to you set out your aromatics before smoking? Im thinking of trying out a cherry blend tonight in my cob.
     
  2. Klauswermann

    Klauswermann Member

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    It really depends on the moisture content of the specific batch, for example, I've had pouches of Captain Black that was perfect to smoke right out of the pouch but in contrast, I recently purchased some Moka Black the took almost 2 days to dry eneugh to light!
     
  3. Klauswermann

    Klauswermann Member

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    I would say that an hour is the butter zone for most Aro's
     
  4. Pschoppy48

    Pschoppy48 Member

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    Depending on the moisture, I usually just load up an aro and smoke. If that Cherry Blend is Middleton's..then right out of the package is fine.
     
  5. phinz

    phinz Active Member

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    I have a pouch of CBW that's been open and drying for 3 years and it's still too damp to smoke. ;)
     
  6. brunchman

    brunchman Member

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  7. cobbsmoker

    cobbsmoker Active Member

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    Over here the WV Smoke Shop sells Century blends but I do not know their origin, you can go to their website and click on tobacco descriptions and it list all the Century blend descriptions.
     
  8. SouthBound

    SouthBound Active Member

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    Good gosh, brunchman! You have access to Condor and St Bruno, man. Why are you wasting your energy on this riffraff tobacco? Go buy yourself a pouch of ready-rubbed Condor.

    Note: I tried to write that in an indignant Cambridge accent.
     
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  9. brunchman

    brunchman Member

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    Hmmmm yes i keep hearing about Condor, but all anyone says is "its good". I'll buy some asap but can anyone tell me anything about it? Why is it talked about like its the best toby in the land? And why do Americans want it so bad? haha :)
     
  10. brunchman

    brunchman Member

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    Oo i also see that Clan has a blend of 14 different tobys, shouldnt it theoretically be amazing? Why dont people talk about it so much?
     
  11. dmkerr

    dmkerr PG- free since '83! Moderator

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    As long as it takes.

    Which means, you'll have to experiment with each blend (and perhaps each pouch/tub/tin) to make that determination. What works for me may be all wrong for you. Some aros require no drying time, some need an hour or so, and some (as Phinz said) never seem to dry enough to become smokable.
     
  12. SouthBound

    SouthBound Active Member

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    I'm just having you on, but with a sincere message. Condor is a fantastic blend, but you might not be ready to like it just yet. If it were available in the States (that's why we want it so badly), I'd smoke it everyday like some of these guys smoke Carter Hall. But it's not, so I'm teasing you about not trying it, even though you can pick it up at your local grocer.
     
  13. brunchman

    brunchman Member

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    Haha, no worries, im genuinely interested in Condor and will get myself a pack on the weekend. But i think you may be right, it may be too soon but we'll see.....
     
  14. Longbottom

    Longbottom Member

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    I don´t dry my tobacco at all. Just pack it directly from the jar. I mostly smoke W.O. Larsen´s Simply Unique and Karl Erik no. 11, both taste great directly (if you like sweet aromatics, that is).
     
  15. brunchman

    brunchman Member

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    Those are yankie blends only unfortunatly :rolleyes: not available in the uk. I would appreciate some other sweet tasting blends tho.
     
  16. Longbottom

    Longbottom Member

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    Brunchman: I´m not sure if you replied to my post, but if yes, then: those blends are actually Danish, not American (well, Karl Erik is a German company, but the tobacco is made for them in Denmark). And they should be available (at least the Larsen one) in the U.K. too! So do please try them, they´re really good. :)
     
  17. brunchman

    brunchman Member

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    I shall! Are Danish blends known for being sweet then?
     
  18. cobbsmoker

    cobbsmoker Active Member

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    Brunchman, you need to hook up with the other UK members here and get in the know as to what is available to you over there and where?
     
  19. Tony Malerich

    Tony Malerich Sales Account

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    This is one of those questions where the best answer is unfortunately vague. "Until it's appropriately dry for you to smoke." I've had several lighter aros (Like Boswell's Best and Christmas Cookie) that I pack as is with no problem. Otherwise... 15 minutes, up to an hour depending on just how wet the tobacco in question is. If it's tinned, you'll probably find it needing a little more time when the tin is freshly opened and a bit less once it's had a few weeks to settle.
     
  20. nesta

    nesta Well-Known Member

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    Danish blends are known for being sweet, and generally for using some flavorings to a degree that either the tobacco is all out aromatic or else semi-aromatic, generally speaking.

    Try Condor. It's good. Also try St. Bruno, which is a little milder and sweeter.
     
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