Is there a thing as too dry tobacco

Discussion in 'Pipe Tobacco' started by Amalgam, Jul 24, 2010.

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  1. Amalgam

    Amalgam Member

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    Hi there guys,

    I do not smoke too much pipe, I only do it when I feel too good or too sad. Also, I live in Florida and with the humidity and the heat the last thing that you want to do is smoke outdoors (the ditactorship that governs in my house does not allow me to do it indoors) When I started to smoke pipe last fall I bougth a eight-blend package and still have a lot of tobacco. A few days ago I landed a good deal with my company and I celebrated with my pipe. But I realized that the flavor in two of my aromaticas was kind of bitter, hot and there was this crackling noise when lighting. I have been storing this batch of tobacco that I bought in individual zip bags and then all the inndividual bags in a big zip one. My question is would this be because the tobacco is to dry? (I can feel them dry to the touch) Do I have to use a humidifier box to keep them? Can I save the tobacco or it is better to put them in the garbage?

    Thank you
     
  2. Luckistrykes

    Luckistrykes Member

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    you could try misting the tobacco with a bit of water to rehydrate it, then for long term storage keep it in mason jars. personally i don't think a humidor is needed. sounds like it is probly a bit dry and burning up real fast.
     
  3. Dondi

    Dondi Active Member

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    One suggestion I've read here (but haven't tried, just echoing) is to place the baccy in a bowl, then stretch a wet towel over the bowl but not touching the baccy. Check the baccy and if it's still too dry when the towel's dry, repeat till the baccy is to your liking.

    Oh and about using the ziplock bags... not a good idea for long-term storage. Best to use glass jars if you're keeping anything for longer than a week.
     
  4. chambers11283

    chambers11283 Member

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    I make my own cigs and i keep my tobacco for that in a air tight contanier and the way i keep in from drying out is take a square of a paper towl and wet it strain it out then wrap it in aluminum foil and poke holes in it and toss it in. As the water evaperates it will go into the tobacco and moisten it back works wonders with my cig tobacco so i dont see why it would not work for your pipe tobacco. Hope this helps, good luck.
     
  5. Falconeer

    Falconeer Active Member

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    Hi All,

    The trick Dondi mentions to rehydrate tobacco was originally posted here, maybe by Jesla - I have tried it and can confirm it does work; I do it with Five Bros and it really does the trick for me.

    Some aromatics are based on pretty mild tobaccos and personally I don't think an aromatic works well when it's dry but many would disagree. Re-hydration might help here. For long term storage I don't think you can beat Mason/Kilner jars so long as the seals are sound. I also use a proper tobacco jar on my desk for any bulk that's open - again it has a good seal and a small sponge in the lid which I slightly moisten and that works too.

    Best to all

    Gerry
     
  6. IRONxPagan

    IRONxPagan Member

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    I was wondering, besides water could one use a slice of apple or an orange peel to keep tobacco hydrated or will this have a drastic change on flavor?
     
  7. Bri2k

    Bri2k Active Member

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    Your best bet (suggested by our own Falconeer), isn't fruit but a potato slice. Tried this myself and it works like a charm and doesn't change the flavor of the tobacco.
     
  8. Mister Moo

    Mister Moo Normal Cow Moderator

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    Rule of thumb (and index finger) for tobak moisture is to pinch a small wad:

    1. if it crumbles it's too dry;
    2. if it mooshes and stays mooshed (these are highly technical terms) it's too moist (or you live in Scotland); or
    3. if it compresses and springs back it's probably in a pretty good place.

    Rehydrating tobak in small bowl plus damp towel over the top is easy/foolproof. Fluff it up once or twice and get it evened out; store in a clean glass jar with sealing lid (like a Mason jar, etc.). The '04 Stonehaven in the Mason jar (picture link below) has aged wonderfully and never needed a hint of added moisture in six years.

    Humidors are for cigars. Baggies are invariably a problem for me. They keep tobak OK but if you forget about 'em for a month, you'll have dry weed.

    http://pipesmokersforum.com/forum/index.php?/gallery/image/176-jarsjpg/
     
  9. WillH

    WillH Active Member

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    A little warning on putting chunks of fruit in tobacco to add moisture. Most fruits have some fungis on them and it can foster the growth of mold! Sorta like bread mold. It can be done but it can easily go bad if one is not very clean.

    Just a heads up!

    Will
     
  10. Mister Moo

    Mister Moo Normal Cow Moderator

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    FWIW I experimented a couple of years ago by rehydrating about a half-pound of not-terribly-dry virginia tobak with an apple slice or two; most of the gear went in a 16-oz jar (with two slices) and some in a baggie (with one slice). All the stuff stayed in a comfortably warm room until it rehydrated - no sign of mold. The apple slices were wafer thin but that was enough to recover the tobak by the time the apple slice was kind of leathery. I repeated the experiment with thick slices and managed to generate a little mold.

    My Conclusion: if you wanna put fruit and vegetables in your tobak, it doesn't take much.
     
  11. hagbard

    hagbard Member

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    FWIW sourdough starter is made from the naturally occurring yeast on fruit. If it can make bread rise it will likely do the same for your tobacco. For some cases I think that the distilled water idea is purely a product of the SITS (Supercilious Internet Tobacco Snobs) but for long term storage and moistening temperamental hydration gear I believe that the less you introduce that isn't water the better. I keep my most used tobaccos in glass jars with a lid that just rests on top. I got a spray bottle for about $1 and will give it a mist and a shake every week or so. The jar lasts about 2 months and I have never had a problem. well,, aside from the time when I absolutely soaked the tobacco trying to get it really moist and then squashed about 70% too much in. I got mold on the bottom that time.
     
  12. Smokingmiami

    Smokingmiami Member

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    I heard that if you put the tobacco in a mason jar and spray it with water two or three times then seal it and put it out in the sun for about 1 hour the tobacco should be good to go. Never have tried it but sounds like it should do the trick of rehydrating.
     
  13. mrlindeman

    mrlindeman Member

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    If the tobacco is to dry a hotter burn will ensue. Possibly affecting flavor, or the life of your taste buds [​IMG]
     
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