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Scandinavian deisgn

Discussion in 'Pipes' started by jhe888, Apr 18, 2011.

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  1. jhe888

    jhe888 Member

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    My office furniture is Danish/American mid-century modern. You know the stuff - very plain, functional, lots of flat planes, and little ornamentation. It was the hip stuff from the '50s and '60s, even into the '70s. It is somewhat severe in style, but made warm by the natural wood and the colors of the fabrics. Ikea is the modern heir to that aesthetic. I guess this all descends from Bauhaus.

    But Danish and Scandinavian pipes from the late '60s onward, seem, to me, anyway, to differ from this sense of style. I mean Preben Holm and his design descendants, even to some of the big names of today, like Ivarrson or Chonowitsch. (I realize not every Danish makers' pipes are like that, but in general, that style.) They are more organic and free flowing. The use of plateau and rounded shapes seems different in many ways from the style of the furniture of the same place and time.

    Has anyone else noticed this? Are the styles alike in some way I have overlooked? Is there some reasons pipe makers have a different vision than furniture designers?
     
  2. HCraven

    HCraven Active Member

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    I tend to think of stereotypical Danish Modern furniture as using a lot of bent plywood (like the classic Eames Chair), following or emulating a natural form, rather than being particularly angular, much in the same way a Danish freehand pipe follows the natural shape of the briar. In that sense, I see some real similarities in the aesthetic.

    At the same time, I know the furniture to which you refer, the simple, spindly, relatively angular stuff that was ubiquitous in the Sixties and early Seventies. My grandparents' house had many good examples of that style when I was growing up (this type of table comes immediately to mind (and I still love tiered tables for their utility, even if they are passe; you can put a lamp on the top tier and magazines or books underneath; how cool is that?!)). While they seem like very different styles, I think the ideas of simplicity and functionality are shared between the first example and the second (as well as the freehand pipe). I guess I would have to be a design historian to explain much more than that.
     
  3. ruffinogold

    ruffinogold Ruffinogold-Mayor, I.R.G.E.--At Large. Mayor

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    I think the diff might be that furniture makers are making furniture that has to function properly where as a pipe maker kinda lets grain dictate to him the shape which wont affect function [ of smoking ] . If a furniture guy shaped furniture to follow grain .. whoa .. what a ride ! :)
     
  4. HCraven

    HCraven Active Member

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    You know, the original MacArthur corn cob would kind of have that Mid-Century Modern feel if it were made of briar and had a dark walnut stain...
     
  5. jpberg

    jpberg Moderator Moderator

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    Looking at 50s-60s Danish furniture and some of Sixten Ivarssons original Stanwell designs, I think you'll see lots of similarities.
     
  6. jhe888

    jhe888 Member

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    An Eames chair is akin to a freehand pipe. Perhaps I am thinking too much of the more severe branch of Scandinavian design. Interesting.
     
  7. Prof

    Prof Member

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    Actually when I thnk angular and severe, I thnk of the American mission style, not Danish. I see alot of that organic shape in the midcentury Danish furniture, especially in the chairs and end tables...they have straight tops but are frequently supported with rounded legs, or bent and elegant arms. I think that when the American machine producers tried to copy the Danish originals, they created a different angular aesthetic that was a result of the restrictions of the machines they used. But many of the teak Danish original wood furniture to me is understated and very organic, certainly compared to the airplane inspired art deco. Most Americans have only seen the American copies of the Danish originals, certainly the only pieces I have seen are online...the value and cost of the originals is astronomical!

    The Danish pipes that attract me are not those that are the wild root balls, but those that are elegant and well balanced...like the furniture of old.

    B
     
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