Simple cellaring to get started

Discussion in 'Pipe Tobacco' started by derangedhermit, Jan 1, 2014.

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  1. Jwb

    Jwb Member

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    You mean there is a difference? Lol
     
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  2. KleinToit

    KleinToit Member

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    Mr GL Pease states in a couple of places (The aging FAQ and on his own website) that the tins he uses and his tobacco for that matter, are made with aging in mind, so they should be fine.
     
  3. KleinToit

    KleinToit Member

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    One thing we should also consider is oxygen. For most sealed products oxygen is the enemy, which is why they usually put a date for consumption on it but also say that once it is opened it should be consumed within a certain amount of time. With tobacco, some oxygen is left in the tin or jar to begin with, to start the aging process (If you would want to preserve the tobacco in its current state (no aging) this oxygen would be evacuated) but since most if not all manufacturers believe that aging betters the flavor of the tobacco they seal their tins airtight (not airless). once the process of aging begins some of the microbes in the tobacco uses up the oxygen and sugar and the second part of the aging other microbes uses the CO2 produced by the first part. As far a mold goes, tins should be safer, but only by a little. No tobacco manufacturer that I know of sterilizes their tobacco before sealing it in the tin, there has been some reports (rare) of mold even in sealed tins, and the trend seems to be that some brands of tobacco are more prone to mold than others (this could be region of growth related or moisture content when packed or a whole heap of other thing). As far as cellaring goes, keeping tobacco in the sealed tins would be ideal, but once it loses its seal it should go into jars, all in all tins are easy but in my mind jars are safer (Very few people have reported losing seals on correctly handled jars, but tins have been reported more often) Tins in a moderately controlled environment should be fine for 40 - 50 years (low humidity to prevent rust, and cool temps to prevent mold if any)

    All of the above should be taken as my opinion, I haven't been cellaring for long enough to have my own data yet, but I have worked in the tobacco production industry for a couple of years (producing snuff mainly) and have read everything I could get my hands on.
     
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  4. derangedhermit

    derangedhermit Reclusive member

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    It sounds like either way should be fine almost all the time. There are many places in either case where something can very occasionally go wrong.

    I would again suggest that using the type of care as used in home canning in any transfer to jars should be helpful.

    I also think the idea of rotating cellar stock is worth discussing. IIRC from Mr. Pease's writings, any long-term storage of aromatics has unknown results (maybe better, maybe worse), that burley benefits little from aging, but Virginia certainly does. So some thinking about what to cellar, how long, and why might be helpful to come up with more specific helpful hints.

    I assume this is about cellaring for personal use. Cellaring for speculation would be another topic.
     
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  5. Jwb

    Jwb Member

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    I have some aromatics with some age on them. The ones I have have not done well. They are kind of tart with a bit of a chemical taste to them. They were bulk and kept in jars. They are bad enough that I won't cellar anymore aromatics except I might cellar a tin of gawith or something similar just to see what happens.
     
  6. jhelms

    jhelms Active Member

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    My point exactly.:bing:
     
  7. Bullwinkle

    Bullwinkle Active Member

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    I see building a cellar as a hedge against future taxes and supply/ban problems. the aging is just an added bonus. new mason jars are dirt cheap so everything headed for the cellar is jarred. (except otc tubs) instead of rolling nice flakes I will add them vertically and then store the jar on it's side. I only deep cellar 8 or 10 blends that I know will stand the test of test.
     
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