sMoking outside

Discussion in 'The Smoking Lounge' started by user2453, Apr 2, 2012.

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  1. ruralhipster

    ruralhipster Member

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    I've never tried siting outside when it's cold, I just bundle up, light the pipe while still on the porch put on the windcap then go for a walk. I couldn't imagine not moving when it's -20 or -30 C.
     
  2. MacNutz

    MacNutz Active Member

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    Well, in Alberta you get real winter. I can't sit still without freezing at 0 C. We don't really get much winter in Vancouver, for which I am very grateful.
     
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  3. Old Codger

    Old Codger Well-Known Member

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    -20 isn't bad as long as it's not windy. Much past -30 I don't go anywhere if I don't have to. Put the car in the ditch out in the country and it can be a long walk, or maybe your last one. We always get one cold snap here every winter that can slow a man down some. Last thing you think about doing outside at -30 or below when it's windy is trying to smoke a pipe. There must have been a day when there was no wind in Southern Alberta but they're rare. There's a reason that wind generators are growing like weeds around here.
     
  4. bigbird48

    bigbird48 Member

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    No garage? I have to go out to my shop where I have a woodburning furnace.
     
  5. MacNutz

    MacNutz Active Member

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    My first experience with real winter was in Alberta. It literally scared me. I had never experienced anything like it before. Being straight up from southern California and in my Texas rinestone cowboy clothes (country band), I stepped out of my hotel to go to the bar for a sound check. Got to the bottom of the hotel steps, ran back in as fast as I could and called a taxi to take me to a clothing store and then to the bar. Damn. When first introduced to that, as a grown up in the wrong clothes, it is like hell itself.

    Years later I spent a year at tree line on Hudson Bay Mountain in norther BC. -40 C, was very common and the wind never stopped. I'm lucky to have survived that winter. Got caught in a couple of very sudden storms and would have died if not for an old silver mine and its many ventilation shafts, sometime occupied by hibernating bears. That is why I live in Vancouver now. I be weak and cowardly.;)
     
  6. Old Codger

    Old Codger Well-Known Member

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    Standard response to someone from back east where it's not as cold but usually more humid. Ya, but it's a dry cold, so ya don't really feel it. It's hard keeping a straight face as you see the confusion. The cold doesn't last very long. +16 today, storm warning and 10-25cm of snow tomorrow, it'll be all melted and gone by Sunday. The thing about -40 that still bothers me after all this time is getting in to the car and for the first mile or so the flat spots on the tires don't round out, so it's bumpier and noisier than all getout since the suspension is stiff as well. You'd need a windcap on your pipe just to keep the contents inside the bowl.
     
  7. MacNutz

    MacNutz Active Member

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    Indeed, I've noticed that people from much colder but drier areas are miserably cold in Vancouver even when the temp is above freezing. It is so wet here it really seeps in through your clothes. Wool is the solution but apparently it isn't popular with younger folks. When I lived in Smithers BC, I came down to Van at the end of January once. I was walking about in a tee shirt and wind breaker whilst the locals were bundled up and grim of face, it was spring time for me. I had Stanley park virtually to myself.

    Glad I didn't smoke when I was on the mountain. Nine miles down a very rugged trail to the nearest piece of logging road which was useless through most of the winter, unless you had a tracked vehicle. :) If you did something stupid or had a serious accident, you died. That was all there was to it.

    I lived in the Texas panhandle for a while. They had rain, snow, heat, and cold, sometimes in a forty eight hour period. And wind....
     
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