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The Purpose of This Is To?

Discussion in 'Pipes' started by rondel65, Apr 28, 2013.

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  1. rondel65

    rondel65 Misplaces Lighters

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    My dad went through a pipe smoking phase in the early to mid 70's. He gave me his pipes a couple of years ago and this was one that I had repaired. It's a meer lined Weber with ?? sticking out of the tenon. Does this ?? cool/regulate the smoke? I have one other pipe from his collection that has the same thing. This is a very good smoker! Are pipes still made with this? View attachment 1206 photo.jpg
     
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  2. Summit

    Summit Live Simply.

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    It is called a Stinger. It is supposed to collect moisture and give you a dry smoke. I have no experience with it but a lot of people cut them off.
     
  3. User3940

    User3940 Active Member

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    Stingers are an odd thing. Some of us prefer them, some of can't wait to get rid of em. Personally I like an open airway and remove the stinger. Some just screw out of the bit, others have to be cut at the tip as the bit screws into the shank, i.e. Kaywoodies. Yours appears like it can be easily removed by either pulling it out or unscrewing it, as the bit on yours just slides into the shank.

    Smoke the pipe with the stinger in and see what you think. If you don't like it, remove it, smoke the pipe again and see the difference. You'll know what to do from that point.
     
  4. rondel65

    rondel65 Misplaces Lighters

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    Thanks for the info. "Stinger" is a good name for it. As long as I can pass a cleaner through it I'll leave it in. I've been smoking it all this time with no problems. This Weber is a very good smoker and one on my more dependable pipes.
     
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  5. lifeon2

    lifeon2 Member

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    That particular stinger is also supposed to double as a pipe tool.
     
  6. mongo

    mongo Active Member

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    How so? I've never heard of that before.
     
  7. Russell Hartman

    Russell Hartman Stay Silver

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    The end of the stinger is machined in such a manor that it does appear to be "spoon" shaped.
    I guess one could use it to scrape & such--a pipe tool.
    If that is in fact the intended purpose--well I learned something.
    I never really smoked pipes too much with stingers, but its like anything else. Its a personal preference.
    As long as the pipe pleases the owner--thats all that counts.:puffy::bing:
     
  8. rondel65

    rondel65 Misplaces Lighters

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    Thanks Russell & Lifeon I believe you two are right! It does indeed scoop out old dottle very nicely.
     
  9. CarlBC

    CarlBC Member

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    The usefulness of a stinger depends both upon the pipe in which it is fitted and the orientation of the stinger.

    Pipe: Some pipes are better suited to stingers than others. There's really no controlling this aspect, other than to remove the stinger from a pipe you know doesn't benefit from having it. Most stingers will come out of the stem with just a slight twist. If it's been bonded to the stem, you'll have to cut it off. Use a Dremel with a cut-off wheel or a jeweler's saw, as end cutters or nippers will crush the aluminum and impede your draw.

    Orientation: As Summit mentioned above, the stinger is there to act as a moisture "condenser". As they are made of aluminum, the stinger tends to remain cooler than the smoke flowing past it, thus causing moisture to condense. The problems arise when the stinger is oriented so that the moisture collects in the flow hole, making it more of a straw than a "dry smoking device". When that happens, you get excessive gurgling and - in a worst case scenario - moisture draw right up to your mouth. If this is happening to your pipe, and the stinger isn't bonded to the stem, try angling the flow hole to either the 4 or 8 o'clock position. This will usually solve the problem.

    Oh...You also need to keep the stinger clean. If it gets gunked up, it loses its ability to condense.

    Somewhere, I have a Zip-loc bag full of stingers from when I was tobacconist. Most of my pipe smokers hated the things.

    :toast:
    -- Carl
     
  10. RTOdhner

    RTOdhner Well-Known Member

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    I yank 'em out... I've never had one that wasn't a PIA.
     
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  11. bosun

    bosun Active Member

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    As mentioned it just serves as a moisture condenser so some of the water vapor with attendant tar/soot (g) collects there. It is just another gimmick. If the condenser just pulls out I pull it and throw it in a box. If I have to cut it like in a Kaywoodie I'll leave it there.
     
  12. rondel65

    rondel65 Misplaces Lighters

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    Thanks for the info Carl. I've never had an issue with the stinger in place. Nothing but good smokes outa this pipe. I'm opening a fresh tin of EMF here in a bit and will smoke this pipe with new knowledge and appreciation for those who responed to this thread.
     
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