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Think I screwed up.....HELP

Discussion in 'Pipes' started by ronbruce61, Jan 4, 2013.

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  1. ronbruce61

    ronbruce61 Member

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    I picked up a very nice Savenelli Estate pipe.This pipe was supposedly cleaned and completely restored.After looking it over and determining that it had indeed been cleaned quite well I decided to go ahead and soak the stem in 80 proof Canadian whiskey just to make sure(GOD only knows who might have been puffing on this thing).After a couple hours I go retrieve it from the whisky and all that black shine on the stem is gone.....up towards the shank it's almost white.


    PLEASE tell me there is a fix for this.......PLEASE.


    Ron
     
  2. CaKy

    CaKy Member

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    Elbow grease and Magic Eraser to start with.:)
     
  3. DocB

    DocB Active Member

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    Barkeepers Friend, and elbow grease like CaKy said. Dump a little powder on a paper plate, and use wet paper towels to dab the powder and rub the stem in a circular motion. It will take it right off and shine up good as new. Might take a bit of effort, but it won't take long once it starts to come off. No worries!!
     
  4. Bear84

    Bear84 Member

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    +1 on the above advice. I would recommend consuming said Canadian whiskey while buffing back to a shine. All work and no whiskey makes...well it just doesn't make any dang sense at all!
     
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  5. ronbruce61

    ronbruce61 Member

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    I used the Canadian whiskey so I would NOT have to drink it.....awful stuff IMO.

    Thanks for the info....I'lll start cleaning her up tomorrow,while sippin some Balvenie Doublewood.


    Ron
     
  6. Imrandy

    Imrandy Member

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    Snob :toast:


    I myself use wifes Gin to soak my stems in pisses her off once she notices the amount going down
    edit= she does not care as long as i replace it
     
  7. t-bear

    t-bear Well-Known Member

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    Just pour it back in the bottle once you're done....she'll never know! LOL
     
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  8. Coda

    Coda Well-Known Member

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    Nothing out of the ordinary...now you just have to buff it back. It'll take time, and a fair bit of labor...but its worth it, in the end.
     
  9. afiaowo

    afiaowo Member

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    You can also check if one of your local shops has a buffing wheel that you can use. Many older stores do.
     
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  10. ruffinogold

    ruffinogold Ruffinogold-Mayor, I.R.G.E.--At Large. Mayor

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    Bingo !
     
  11. ronbruce61

    ronbruce61 Member

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    I got most of it with the Barkeepers Friend and elbow grease.The corners still look slightly stained.I think I'm fixin to break out my small Dremel tool with a buffer wheel.

    I mean this just made me sick.....This pipe is the most beautiful of my small collection.The black on the stem was shining like new money before I dunked it.I just hope I can get it back.I'll try to post a pick up later on today.


    Thanks guys
     
  12. Coda

    Coda Well-Known Member

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    Its not stained. Thats what its supposed to look like after you soak it.
     
  13. Longshanks

    Longshanks He who shall; so shall he... wait, who?

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    Kind of makes you wonder what the previous 'restoration expert' used to hide the oxidation prior to your alcohol soak. In my experience a clean stem would have (at most) only lost its wax luster.
     
  14. WyoBob

    WyoBob Member

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    A Dremel with a buffing wheel operates at a pretty high rpm and you might end up with some waves in your stem. A large buffing wheel, moving at a slower rpm, would be a better idea.
     
  15. ronbruce61

    ronbruce61 Member

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    OK I i have a small multi-speed drill that'll take the same bit.I'll go that route...Thanks


    Ron
     
  16. ronbruce61

    ronbruce61 Member

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    Well it lost it's wax luster and the color changed from off white to dull brown.The shiny black is coming back it's just going to take a lot of work.Pics of the pipe are up now.

    Ron
     
  17. Waino

    Waino Active Member

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    Sandpaper, roughness 2000, and time.
     
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  18. Splat

    Splat Member

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    This is my method for bringing those sorry estate stems back to a shiny new life.

    I soak my newly acquired estates in regular household bleach for 24 hours. This sanitizes and cleans the stem. While letting the stem soak overnight in bleach I start working on the bowl. I do a S&A treatment to the bowl using course non-Iodized sea salt and Everclear. Put a pipe cleaner into the shank to plug the draught hole. Load the bowl with sea salt about 1/6" down from the rim. I use an eyedropper to apply the Everclear because you just want to saturate the salt enough. Try not to get the Everlear on the finish because it'll remove it. Wipe any spillage off immediately. When the salt stops soaking up the Everclear and it starts to pool at the top you've got enough. Now place the bowl so it won't fall over spilling all that salt and Everclear. Let that sit for 24 hours. Depending how much the pipe's been previously smoked and what tobacco was smoked you can get a light shade of brown to a darker shade of brown. That's the tobacco oils and residues removed from the briar. Then spill the salt out of the bowl, ensuring to get any salt particles from the bowl. You could do another treatment but I usually do this once.

    Now we move back to the stem. When removing the stem from the bleach oxidation will become evident. Cleaning off the bleach from the stem I wash the stem in water a number of times and then let it soak in water for a good while. I usually let it soak in clean water for a few hours.

    Now we move onto the fun part of this whole project. If you don't have a buffer but do have a variable speed drill or drill press then you're in luck. Here in the USA there is a chain of stores called Harbor Freight. They basically sell inexpensive Asian made tools and accessories. You can get a cheap buffer or grinder and tripoli and white compounds there. They also sell a decent 4-piece buffing kit for around $5. The item# is 43657. There's a couple of nice things about this kit. It uses 1/4" mandrels so you can easily mount the wheels in a hand drill or drill press if you don't have a buffer. The brown and white included compounds aren't the best but will do the job. I've done about 10 estates with this kit and it hasn't let me down yet.

    Mount a buffing wheel into your drill or drill press. Using a heat gun heat the brown compound just enough to facilitate an easier application to the wheel. Now buff the stem, never keeping it stationary for more than 3 seconds lest we damage the stem. After that wipe down the stem with a clean microfiber rag. Time to change to the second wheel, heat the white compound and then load it onto the wheel. When that's done once again a microfiber cloth is used to wipe off the compound. Now your stem will be shiny but you won't get it really nice until a good coat of carnauba wax goes on. Use another microfiber towel to apply the wax. If you've done enough buffing and applied the wax your results should now be impressive with a shiny stem staring back at you. If you don't have or want to use carnauba then Chapstick applied with a rag will also gain excellent results! :thu:
     
  19. WrightwoodJohn

    WrightwoodJohn Wrightwood expatriate

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    Next time use Jameson's, that Canadian stuff is apparently too harsh.
     
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  20. ronbruce61

    ronbruce61 Member

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    Thats the only use I can think of for Jameson's,it certainly isn't fit to drink.I'm a Bushmills kind of guy,Black Bush to be more specific.


    Ron
     
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