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Buffing RPM Speed

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User3940

Active Member
Member
#1
I finally got a buffing wheel for Christmas. The RPM on the motor says 3450, and takes 6" wheels. Is that sufficient for buffing and polishing briar? It is a single speed.

 

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#2
Found this for you:
For best results your wheel should maintain a surface speed of between 3600 & 7500 Surface Feet Per Minute. (SFPM). The higher your speed, the better and quicker your results.

Formula for calculating surface speed of wheel in SFPM.
SFPM = 1/4 x diameter of Wheel x RPM (revs of spindle per min.)
http://www.caswellplating.com/buffs/images/Buffbook.pdf
SO, your 6" WHEEL @ 3450 = 5460 sfpm.
Seems GTG to me!

BUT, I have only polished my pipes on a ~ 2" conical buff chucked in my drill press spinning at 2340. I run an 8" grinder in my garage @ 3600 (7200 sfpm). I run normal grinding wheels, wire wheels, and a hard buff only for metals (so far). Frankly, I don't think I'd want to touch my pipes to it. I prefer slower. I am interested in what others say about your plan because I have been thinking about getting a 6" grinder that spins @ 3450 (Dewalt DW756).

I consider buffers among the most dangerous tools in any shop --- I don't think I'm alone in thinking this way. I'm not an expert or even a very experienced woodworker (by any definition) and I would recon that a "slower" buff will do just fine and it will probably be safer/more forgiving on delicate items. Slow wheels just take longer. I'm sure more knowledgeable folks will be chiming in shortly.
 

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#5
Coastie -- maybe you should step down to 4" wheels on it?

The Wood Buff is designed to be used with a 1/3 hp or more, 1725 motor. This should be sufficient for most buffing tasks; larger items or a more vigorous buffing style may call for 1/2 hp. The 3,000 r.p.m. of most grinder motors will be too fast for the 8" wheels sold with the Wood Buff but would work well for buffing with our smaller 4" Wheels or Bowl Buffs. When you face the shaft end of the motor, the wheel should rotate counter-clockwise in order for the Wood Buff to work properly.
http://www.bealltool.com/products/buffing/buffer.php
 

Super K

Active Member
Member
#7
Why not rig a variable speed control? I used an old pump motor with a fancy control switch for my reloading operations. The 110 splices in to the power cord of the motor. I can slow down or speed up the motor. Do not use a regular rheostat found at the hardware store, you'll toast your motor. You may need a different model based on amps required by your motor.

I used this
KB Electronics Solid State Variable Speed AC Electric Motor Control 2.5 Max amps 115V # K177-1002 by Speed Control http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000F9B712/ref=cm_sw_r_udp_awd_hOgVsb1V3S4F1
Setup looks like this
 

xrundog

Active Member
Member
#9
I have my drill press set to around 1700 rpm. Maybe even the next step down which I think is 1250. I could see maybe 2500 for shaping stems. At my setting it takes me a while to polish stems. But I kind of like a slower process. It easier to track progress. Your rig would be great for polishing stones. But I think it would be hard to manage wood without burning or disfiguring it. With my setup I can sling a bowl pretty hard when my grip fails. I'm afraid to use a higher speed. I could be wrong though. Maybe some daredevil will chime in and say it will work okay for you. Try it on a Medico or some other low grade.
 

Mister Moo

Gone but not forgotten
Staff member
Member
#10
I finally got a buffing wheel for Christmas. The RPM on the motor says 3450, and takes 6" wheels.
Conventional wisdom says speeds over 1800, even with a 4" floppy flannel wheels, are suitable for melting vulcanite and lucite, very good for removing nomenclature and renowned for launching pipes. Out of convenience I once tried to disprove CW using a 1750-3600 variable on beaters... I'd not encourage something that fast on a pipe you're proud of.

I do a lot of restores and maintenance with a variable Foredom buffer and, even with small wheel, it probably operates most between 800-1200 rpm.
 

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t-bear

Active Member
Member
#12
!725 RPM is what I would recommend....no faster! You can destroy nomenclature, scar stems and rocket a good pipe across the room at the speeds you're running.
 

User3940

Active Member
Member
#13
I put 4" wheels on the buffer/polisher. Did a couple pipes with White Diamond and Carnuba, being careful to keep moving and not heat things up too much. Also did the stems.

All I can say is...oh my God. Amazing how much shine you can get out of a pipe and stem with Carnuba. Now I am going to polishing everything, including the cat if she holds still long enough.
 

User3940

Active Member
Member
#14
I did learn that putting the buffer on my workbench, with all my pipes in their racks behind it, is not a good idea. This process sure puts out a lot of dust. What a mess. So the buffer will be moved to its own table to minimize how many time I have to wipe down all my pipes.
 

Super K

Active Member
Member
#16
I can bend you a custom backstop from lex an or sheet aluminum if you'd like, throw a piece of PVC on the back and you can hook a shop vac to the backstop to accumulate the dust.
 

User3940

Active Member
Member
#17
I can bend you a custom backstop from lex an or sheet aluminum if you'd like, throw a piece of PVC on the back and you can hook a shop vac to the backstop to accumulate the dust.
Thanks for the offer. I moved the buffer to a different location and just got through using it there. It is more convenient and does not make a mess now, so no need for a back splash. I do appreciate the offer though.

It is amazing what Tripoli, White Diamond, and Carnuba can do for a pipe. Amazing. I wish I had this when I did your pipes.
 

t-bear

Active Member
Member
#18
My buffing setup is in an alcove in the shop. I have it lined with 1" thick foam board.....helps keep things from nicking or shattering when one gets away....and one will!! LOL
 

ruffinogold

Well-Known Member
Mayor
#19
Why not rig a variable speed control? I used an old pump motor with a fancy control switch for my reloading operations. The 110 splices in to the power cord of the motor. I can slow down or speed up the motor. Do not use a regular rheostat found at the hardware store, you'll toast your motor. You may need a different model based on amps required by your motor.

I used this
KB Electronics Solid State Variable Speed AC Electric Motor Control 2.5 Max amps 115V # K177-1002 by Speed Control http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000F9B712/ref=cm_sw_r_udp_awd_hOgVsb1V3S4F1
Setup looks like this


3,450 is really hauling ass ! The speed control is a good idea and doesnt take rocket science to set up .

I'm glad you got a buffer , Coastie !!! Now I'm sure you see why I always say for people to make or buy a buffer ... theres no comparison between having or not having one
 

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