Crumble Cake question...

Discussion in 'Pipe Tobacco' started by beammeuptothesky, Feb 7, 2012.

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  1. Sasquatch

    Sasquatch Sales Account

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    Its still fun though, and if you like the Va/Pers I sent you last week, then I'll send some Kingfisher your way and you can have a go at a crumble.
     
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  2. jeff394

    jeff394 Member

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    Looks like particle board to me, but that Briar Fox is some pretty good stuff.
     
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  3. Glenn

    Glenn Active Member

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    Sas, Penzance and Kingfisher are crumble cakes where chopped up tobacco is pressed into a plug and then sliced. The fall apart and rub out super easy. Kajun Kake and Briar Fox are crumble cakes where the tobacco is chopped slightly more coarse and pressed into a plug but not sliced. It is very hard and tightly packed. It is alot harder to tear chunks off. At least in the beginning. Once you get it going and get a good portion used it gets alot easier to break some off. The first few bowls you have to work at to get enough torn off to fill a bowl.
     
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  4. nesta

    nesta Well-Known Member

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    The first crumble cakes I ever smoked were all Germain. Smoker's Haven Krumble Kake (by Germain), Penzanze, and Kingfisher. I read of other crumble cakes and when I first tried Night Train I was a little disappointed in the presentation...."how lazy!" I thought. "What's the point?" I later pondered. When rubbed out it's just like any other C&D "fish food" tobacco.

    Then I supposed it's probably good for letting the flavors marry while aging. I tried smoking the stuff and was pleased with the product so eventually I thought "ah, to heck with it, who cares why it's made this way?"

    Actually, I tried the Lakeland Brickle blends from H&H before Night Train, but as they aren't exactly billed as "crumble cake" as far as I remember I just figured it was just pressed like that to make it easy to pack and ship. Works well for that. And in fairness, they're much less dense than Night Train. Sort of an extra crumbly crumble cake.

    Anyway, the way to handle the stuff is to just not sweat it and do what comes naturally to both you and the tobacco. Crumble it. Fill pipe. Proceed as normal.

    (One caveat though - I personally find the Germain crumble cakes -may- burn hot if well crumbled and not sufficiently dried prior to packing, if you keep puffing to keep it lit. Use common sense and caution with this blender when leaf is presented this way, lest you may do what I've done in the past and notice a little bit of a toasted briar taste near the bottom of the bowl and then some minor spiderwebbing after you dump out the ash. You've been warned!)
     
  5. Lestrade

    Lestrade Active Member

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    Yeah it is!
     
  6. jpberg

    jpberg Moderator Moderator

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    If you can pick the "cube" (or whatever shape) up without it falling apart, you've got a cake, or plug. If you try to pick it up and end up with little pieces of tobacco in your hand, it's a crumble cake.
    There's other differences, but that's the basic one, and the important one when discussing how to load a pipeful.
     
  7. Glenn

    Glenn Active Member

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    Even though it is packed tight it still crumbles. It just takes more work. I guess it is a non-crumble cake.

    I think of a plug as being like Jacknife Plug where it is whole leaves or larger pieces of leaves stacked and pressed where you have to cut off slices or pieces. Where you can't just rub it out with your fingers right off the block

    There are always a few that sorta could go either way. Like SLF. Is it a flake or a plug or a crumble cake? Shoot, I can't pull a flake off of it. I do good to just peel little bits and pieces off and it falls apart as I do. I know it was cut as a flake at one time but by the time it is all mashed together and packaged it acts like something else.
     
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