Edward G. Robinson Blend?...

Discussion in 'Pipe Tobacco' started by Coda, Jul 6, 2012.

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  1. Coda

    Coda Well-Known Member

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    I am a history student. This fall, I am partaking in an independent study called "Civil War and Reconstruction." My summer assignment (mostly self assigned) is to read as much as possible on the Civil War, so that I am capable of getting the most out of the class. A few months ago, before I even knew about the class, I watched the great documentary "The Civil War" by Ken Burns. One of the historians featured in the documentary was Shelby Foote. He is the highlight of the documentary for me. The way he speaks about the Civil War is incredibly. Anyway, he has a 3 part series called "The Civil War: A Narrative." I am currently reading the first book. So, I decided to look up some videos of Mr. Foote, with the desire to see if anyone had taken all of his clips from the Ken Burns doc, and made one, long, glorious video. What I found was an interview, during which Shelby Foote pulls out his pipe and lights up. After a bit of research, I found that he smoked "Edward G. Robinson" Blend, by Sutliffe Tobacco Company. Its a lot of cavindish.

    I was just wondering if anyone had ever smoked it before? I am not a fan of cavindish heavy blends, but seeing how Shelby Foote smoked it, I wouldnt mind trying it. I dont think is available any more though.

    Now, to make this a little more discussionable, have you ever tried or bought a tobacco because someone you admire smoked it? I bought a tin of R-blend because of Einstein...

    What say you?...
     
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  2. RTOdhner

    RTOdhner Well-Known Member

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    I've seen the blend for sale for about $30 or so per tub, but I've never tried it - although I have been curious. Legend has it that it's a blend developed especially for Edward G. Robinson. Nothing wrong with that, but that was back in 1950's and tastes in tobacco were different. Assuming they stuck to the original formula, it should be a pretty old school OTC type of smoke. Nothing wrong with that either, cuz I like old school OTC's.

    As for smoking a blend just cuz someone I admired smoked it, well, I wouldn't have begun smoking a pipe if it wasn't for that. I often try new blends due solely to the recommendation of people I respect and admire here at PSF. Sometimes it's worked out well, others not so much. But I don't get upset about the "not so much" blends because personal taste is a fickle thing. I'm a bit of a history buff myself, and I really enjoy the documentaries that Shelby Foote has been involved with. I figure he was a pipe smoker for quite some time, and if he liked EGR, than I believe I'll get around to ordering a tub cuz I figure he wouldn't have smoked bad tobacco.

    Then again, I once knew a Perisan linguist who had excellent taste in tobacco but who also enjoyed smoking straight Latakia so I guess it's all a crap shoot in the end...
     
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  3. Arkie

    Arkie Active Member

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    Reviews on it are mixed. I wouldn't mind trying it but I wouldn't buy a whole tub of it in order to sample it.
     
  4. Pschoppy48

    Pschoppy48 Member

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    I often try blends because I saw someone smoking the blend or heard they smoked it. When I started smoking a pipe, most of the tobacco I smoked was due to someone.
     
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  5. MacNutz

    MacNutz Active Member

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    I often try tobaccos for very silly reasons. I mean we will never really know what Sherlock and Dr. Watson smoked. Will we? :) I still want to smoke what Einstein smoked. My first interest in Maltese Falcon was, of course, inspired by the Dashiel Hammet stories. I love it for other reasons but it was the literary/Sam Spade connection that got my original interest. There is a kind of romanticism involved in the pipe and pipe tobaccos that doesn't exist in the rest of the tobacco world, certainly not to the same degree. For me, that is part of what I love about the pipe and the tobaccos.
     
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  6. tungbite

    tungbite Member

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    I smoked Edward G. Robinson's blend probably 40 years ago. Sadly I can not remember what type of tobacco was in it, but it might have been an aromatic. It could not have been too bad as I believe I smoked a few pouches of it.
     
  7. cobbsmoker

    cobbsmoker Active Member

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  8. LawMonkey

    LawMonkey Member

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    Why do I picture EGR as a cigar smoker? I think I'll have to try this sometime, perhaps as a double bill with GLP's Key Largo while watching... Key Largo. :)
     
  9. JimInks

    JimInks Active Member

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  10. MakDragon

    MakDragon Wizard of PSF

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    I too looked for the tobacco smoked by J R R Tolkien. A long while ago a once member of this forum, Jerry from the UK sent me what he believed to be that tobacco. It was just cool to smoke what Professor Tolkien smoked so long ago.
     
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  11. Terry292

    Terry292 Member

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    Edward G. Robinson was quite a well-known pipe smoker in his day. This is the first page of an article he did for Collier's magazine, sometime in 1960. I'm not sure of the exact date because I can't remember where I filed the magazine.

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. JimInks

    JimInks Active Member

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    I'm reposting this from an earlier post in case it gets missed by someone reading this thread: I just wrote a review of the blend at Tobacco Reviews, partly because I like to write them, and partly because I'm slightly annoyed by a few of the reviews of EGR. I [really] don't believe some of those people actually ever tried it. I talked to Rich at 4Noggins about carrying it, and he was unenthused about carrying it because the reviews convinced him it's a bad tobacco. Well, it's not great, but it's not what a few of those "reviewers" claim it is. I know there are a couple of online retailers who carry it, but it'd be nice to get it from a place who offers a PSF discount and free shipping.

    What bugged me is that there are a few "reviews" in a row there that are obvious to me that those people probably never smoked the stuff. I, like a number of other people, believe there are posters at TR who are interested in just jacking up their review count, and I think EGR Blend suffered some because of it. Two particular reviewers who said it bites, and has a flat taste could not have possibly ever smoked it. I probably seem biased because I'm obviously an EGR fan, but no matter how much I liked the actor, if the tobacco was bad, I'd say so. It's not a great tobacco, but it's a decent mixture that has a nice, light sweet aro taste. It doesn't bite, no goop. Even if you don't like the taste - and we all have our own various preferences in that arena - "flat" is the one thing nobody who ever smoked it could honestly say. Sorry to keep going on about this, but it's those kind of reviews that I feel are dishonest and cause not only potential smokers to shy away, but retailers, too. I don't love this tobacco myself, but I do like it, and if I thought those few in a row one star reviews were honest, I'd not say one word. Well, we've seen it happen with other blends at that site and others, but it's not a subject that gets discussed too often. I thought I would do so to get it out of my system to anyone who might care to read my opinion, which may or may not carry any weight with whomever is reading this.
     
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  13. Thuber88

    Thuber88 Active Member

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    I find this kind of thing more and more prevalent on forums, and reviews, it is either shills pumping up a product or a movie to get us to buy into it, or the reverse, I have never held,smoked,tasted,shot, or owned any of the things I am reviewing or commenting on, but I can tell you with great fervor, from 5th handed hearsay, that its the worst,most awful,dangerous piece of garbage on the planet. And I know what I am talking about, my buddies uncle's, butchers son, said that about me.
    I'm pretty sure he did anyway.:rolleyes:
     
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  14. JimInks

    JimInks Active Member

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    One of these reviewers felt he was "expert" enough to gage the merits of this bend after 3 minutes of smoking it. nbg
     
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  15. Thuber88

    Thuber88 Active Member

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    If it looks like a fish, and smells like a fish... ok, a fish analogy doesn't fit well, but the idea is there.

    Blue cheese can smell bad, so it must be horrible to use with any food.. isn't it??

    I don't like the looks of the tin, the stuff inside must be horrible too.

    You can never win with some people, but you can bury them in the forest and smile..:eek:
     
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  16. JimInks

    JimInks Active Member

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    I've learned to take critics with a grain of salt. One reviewer of my book on the late artist Carmine Infantino made the comment that Carmine and I skipped over parts of his career as we raced towards the next big moment. The book was 221 pages of art and text. The first big moment in his career wasn't mentioned until page 58. The last big moment (with several big and small ones inbetween) ends on page 131. What did he think was on the other pages? Treatises on astro-physics? :rolleyes:

    He also said he wished I had not stuck to a list of prepared questions. There was no such list. The guy obviously had no idea how the interview was conducted. The interview took parts of five years to do, and the first half of the 18 hours of tape were barely about his big moments. We weren't working on a book then; we were just talking about things important to Carmine, and he wanted a record of them on tape. When we decided to turn the interviews into a book, we sort of did a formal interview the rest of the time. Since I knew Carmine's career, who he knew and what he did, nearly as well as Carmine himself, I had no more than a dozen written questions to ask. The interviewer didn't read the book; he skimmed it. He gave the book 5 stars, but he had to work overtime to find something to criticize so he'd look like he was being objective. It did not occur to him (though he knew my background, which is well documented in several places) that I had spent the last twenty-plus years researching the history of comics, conducted several hundred interviews, and knew the subject thoroughly. Not to mention that Carmine and I were very close friends for years, so I had already heard many of his stories before we ever taped a single word. And not to mention that I've worked in the business over twenty years and before that, ran a comic book shop and put on nine comic book conventions with many of the all-time comic art greats as guests. I didn't say anything about his review because he did not deny it was a good book and as noted, gave it five stars. But I had to laugh at his assumptions, all of which were incorrect.
     
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  17. Thuber88

    Thuber88 Active Member

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    Critics get paid to criticize, if they cant complain about something, they feel like they will be unemployed or so it seems.
     
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  18. venvariants

    venvariants New Member

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    I agree with JimInks. I saw some reviews of Sutliff's R-Blend, and was struck that some of the people weren't even actually trying the tobacco! I mean, there was no similarity whatsoever to the product I was smoking and the tobacco they were describing!

    Carmine did live long enough to see the Edward G. Blend come back, and knew they were paying homage to him by using the same design, did he not?
     
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