I was born in the wrong century

Status
Not open for further replies.

ddandb

Member
Member
#1
My wife was out the other night so there I was...
Sitting in the easy chair, legs propped up, cat in my lap, watching the fire place, smoking some 1792 while listening to Glenn Miller.

I can't help but think of simpler times when smoking a pipe.
 

Cobra

Member
Member
#2
ddandb said:
My wife was out the other night so there I was...
Sitting in the easy chair, legs propped up, cat in my lap, watching the fire place, smoking some 1792 while listening to Glenn Miller.

I can't help but think of simpler times when smoking a pipe.
I like Artie Shaw.:)
 

Stan41

Member
Member
#5
Me too!

I remember the 1950's

Prince Albert was 10 cents per can.

Bull Durham and Duke's Mixture were 5 cents per sack or 6 sacks for a quarter.

Almost all the pipe smokers I knew smoked Sir Walter Raleigh and owned one pipe.

Anyone could buy cigarettes, cigars, or pipe tobacco regardless of age.

Cigarettes were a quarter per pack.

All Doctor's office waiting rooms had ash trays and smoking was commonplace.

My Doctor smoked cigars.

The Hospital waiting room had ash trays and a cigarette vending machine.

Doctors and nurses walked down the hospital halls smoking and seeing about their patients.

My Dentist laid his lit cigarette on the little round swivel tray that also had his tools while he worked on my teeth.

At the drugstore we used the Pharmacist smoked a huge bent Rhodesian while he filled prescriptions. It smelled heavenly.

TV reporters smoked while reading the evening news.

Almost all Banks, Insurance Agencies, and Restaurants gave away advertising book matches.
 

Falconeer

Active Member
Member
#6
Just so - a pipe worn in the outside breast pocket of a suit was the ultimate badge of respectability, the large department stores had leather couches chairs and pedestal ashtrays on each floor for husbands to sit and smoke while their wives shopped, hospital consultants smoked on the wards while making their round with their students and even offered interesting patients a cigarette etc etc,

Gerry
 

Falconeer

Active Member
Member
#8
Hi,

On this theme, here's a little piece I wrote for another Forum on which I post about Xmas 1969 - hope it's not too long

In Dear Auld Scotia it?s been a snowy weekend and it looks like it?ll be a White Christmas the like of which we haven?t had in years. Sitting here in our warm comfortable ninth floor flat looking out towards Ben Nevis and the Highland Line watching the snow fall has taken my mind, or what?s left of it, back to the first Christmas I spent in my own flat ? Christmas 1969.

While it wasn?t exactly Christmas in The Workhouse, money had been tight. I was not long married; we?d a baby son about to see his first Christmas. In the October I?d left a well-paid shop floor job in Stein?s Brickworks to embark on my first trainee career job at the company?s Head Office but in so doing I?d lost out on free transport to work, paid overtime, production bonuses, shift allowances etc etc, so ?every penny was a prisoner? as they say.

My first wife was a good budgeter and was adept at making money go a long way and she?d recently been paid for some hand knitted Aran sweaters she made to order, plus I?d saved money for extras by getting off the bus in the town centre and walking the mile and a half down to our house.

We were young and optimistic and believed we could do anything and we?d a lot to be thankful for. We?d plenty of coal in the cellar for the open fire in our two roomed, walk up, cold
water flat, the Christmas chicken had been bought and stuffed, we?d bought a large Teddy Bear and a Golliwog for Mark, I?d even managed to lay in six cans of beer for the holiday and I?d bought my wife a black ebony jewellery box as a present and slipped a note into it saying one day she?d have it filled.

Things are so different now, that people don?t believe how little we needed back then to be happy and comfortable. For example our friends Eileen and Joe with their baby Joe were living in a flat only lit by gaslight, with an outside toilet at the end of the yard; Rab and Jeanette our other friends with their baby had electricity in their flat but had to share a toilet on the landing with three other families. All of us only had old second hand furniture. None of us could afford a television but we?d old valve radios for entertainment and we all considered ourselves pretty lucky to be where we were.

Christmas was on a Wednesday that year; we worked Christmas Eve, got Christmas Day and Boxing Day off with pay and had to go back to work on the Friday. It was snowing heavily as I got off the bus and stopped in to a Fish and Chip Shop on the way home to get us fish suppers as a Christmas Eve treat ? we thought this was wonderful as we ate them in front of the fire.

We decided to stay up til midnight to see in Christmas and as we looked out our window as the steeple bells chimed it was snowing heavily. We thought it incredibly beautiful looking down on the snow covered trees in the street.

I hadn?t been expecting a Christmas present but actually enjoyed giving my wife her jewellery box and seeing her face light up when she saw it and read the note inside. From her bag she produced a small wrapped package for me.

?I got paid for the two sweaters and they gave me a deposit for another so I thought you?d like this,? she said.

Opening the parcel I found two pipes and an ounce of St. Bruno Flake. Of course the pipes were ?baskets? but I treasured them for years as a memento. I can never yet see a Bulldog and a Bent Apple without thinking of them???.

There?s been a lot of the proverbial water under the bridge since then; my first wife and I have been divorced for many years, we?ve both been remarried for about 15 years and the baby son having his first Christmas is now a Sergeant in the RAF and on his second marriage too.

Time goes in all too quickly ? may I wish you all as Happy a Christmas as I had back then and may you have many good friends and family to share it with?oh yes and hopefully a pipe or two and some good tobacco to enjoy!

Gerry
 
#12
Thanks Gerry, very well put. I think we all need to be reminded of how much we have and be thankful instead of whining about all the things we want (especially us youngsters).
 
#14
Silverado said:
The more I read and find out about history, the more I wish I had lived in the 1800's.

Or the 1500's, or the 1100's...
not 1100's. No tobacco:bing: (not in Europe anyway) Unless you were a native american, it was an untapped resource until 1492.
 

piper

Member
Member
#15
We're still coasting on the achievements of our forefathers. I'd like going back in time for their values, but the consequences of those values are still with us and it makes it harder to say what time you'd rather live in. At some point though, if we stay on the same track we've been on, I think everyone is going to be wishing they could have been born 100 years ago.
 

Demented

Member
Member
#17
stummel bum said:
...it was an untapped resource until 1492.
1585 my friend.

Sir Walter Raleigh helped found the infamous settlement on Roanoke Island in Virginia (though he did not venture there himself) in 1585. Europeans first exposure to “Uppowoc”, as the Algonquian people knew it, was at Roanoke. Later it came to be known by its Spanish name "Tobacco".

As a side note: King James the first, imposed a 4,000% increase in taxes on tobacco in 1605 (a mere 16 years after its introduction to Europeans), trying to convince people to quit the practice of smoking.
 

Stan41

Member
Member
#20
More that I remember from the 1950's

Automobiles did not require a state inspection sticker.

Texas Fishing Licenses were $2.15 but were not needed if fishing in your home county.

Texas Hunting Licenses were $3.15 but were not needed if hunting in your home county or you were hunting deer.

Texas didn't have a sales tax or a state income tax.

Texas did have a poll tax - $1.75.

Throwing out trash on the highway was legal.

The speed limit was 60 mph daytime and 55 mph at night.

Highway Patrolmen and Police didn't have radar units.

Anybody - A boy of 12 years could walk into a hardware store, buy a gun and some ammunition and nothing was written down. They didn't even ask his name. (I was that boy.)

Wearing of Automobile seat belts was not required. Automobiles didn't have seat belts.

Automobiles didn't have pollution controls.

I got a full fledged driver's license at age 14. No driver education, just studied a booklet and took the test.

Stan
 
Status
Not open for further replies.