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My first restore.

Discussion in 'Repair, Maintenance & Restoration' started by RealtorAdam, Jan 6, 2014.

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  1. RealtorAdam

    RealtorAdam Member

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    I know I'm new, but I've been reading/researching for a bit now on restoring and finishing pipes. I recently bought a couple pipes from ebay that looked like they could use some TLC. The first one is this pipe. Not sure of the make, but it has an A on the stem. It seems to have been cleaned pretty well on the inside. but it did have some black spots of stain on the outside. I sanded them off, and sanded the rim of the bowl down a bit, as well as polishing up the stem. Below are some before and after pics. I failed to take before pics, so they are the ones from the ebay listing.
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    Here are some pics from after, Not the greatest, but for my first time, I don't think I did terrible.
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    I did have a bit of a mess up though. When I was sanding the shank to try and get rid of a couple of black stain spots on it. I ended up rounding out the corners, making the joint with the stem not so flush. I then decided to try sanding it back to a sharp edge, well, in the process, I got it at the wrong angle, and this happened:

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    Any suggestions on how to fix this?

    On a side note, I fired up a small bowl in it this afternoon to begin building a cake, and it smokes wonderfully! It may be in the running for one of my favorite smokers.

    The second pipe that I got is an old nasty peterson. Not sure of the model, I've looked and I can't find the same shape anywhere, The closest ones I can find have straight sides on the bowl, and the angle of the shank is a bit different. Anyway, I spent quite a bit of this afternoon playing with it. I'll post some after pics when I'm finished. For now, here are the before pics that I took.

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    As you can see, The stem was very heavily oxidized, and had some major tooth marks. The bowl had a lot of cake in it, and there was tar everywhere. I didn't take a picture down the shank, but it had tar buildup galore, and the whole thing smelled as "broken in" as it looked.

    I'm almost done with it, It's just getting a S&A treatment overnight tonight to pull all the remaining smell out. Tomorrow I'll buff out the bowl and make sure everything fits together and post some more pics!

    In the mean time, I'd love for some feedback, and critiques What could I have done better on the first one?
     
    Dimik, SidStavros, CavenFish and 5 others like this.


  2. User3940

    User3940 Active Member

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    Nice save on that first pipe. The fun part of restoration is the fact that you learn something new with every pipe you work on. I think it's a great hobby.
     
    mitchell likes this.
  3. OBro

    OBro Member

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    Nice job on the first pipe! It looks miles better than the sad state it was in.

    As far as the gap between the shank and stem. I'm just spitballing here since I've never personally experienced the problem before, but if I were in your shoes, I'd just sand down the end of the tenon on the stem so it meets up flush with the shank. I would put down a piece of sand paper on a flat surface, and carefully sand it down a little at a time checking for fit. I would just be careful to make sure that the stem stay vertical while doing it so that end stays flat.

    That's my theory on it. Hopefully someone that has done this before will come along and shed some insight.
     
  4. KingsTarantula

    KingsTarantula Active Member

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    Nice clean up job Adam!
     
  5. RealtorAdam

    RealtorAdam Member

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    The problem isn't the length of the tenon, It's the angle of the top of the shank. The front is a smidge higher than the back, making it come in contact with the stem on one side, but not the other. I think the sandpaper flat on the table might be the best idea to try. I originally used a power sander to do it. I think doing it by hand will give me more control.
     
  6. OBro

    OBro Member

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    Ahh...that make sense. I was just going off of what I saw in the pictures. I thought the tenon was bottoming out in the mortise. :msty: If that's the case then, I think you are right in trying to fix the angle of the shank with a flat reference. That's half the adventure of restoring pipes is figuring everything out. The other half is smoking the crap out of the awesome pipe you just brought back from the grave.

    Happy puffing Adam, and keep up the good work! :bing: I'm sure that Pete is going to turn out awesome. It's a lovely shape.
     
    RealtorAdam likes this.
  7. Hawkwood

    Hawkwood Member

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    Your shank angle is not too far off. Use a flat file or sandpaper wrapped around a flat file. Go slow checking fit often. Your Peterson looks to be a very good candidate for a resto, vintage and not gouged/chewed.
     
  8. User3940

    User3940 Active Member

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    I would avoid using power tools on your briar as things happen quickly and before you know it you have taken too much material. I prefer to do all sanding by hand. Sames goes with using a Dremel or other rotary tool. Unless you are familiar with the speeds, angles, and different bit results do not put one to a pipe.
     
  9. RealtorAdam

    RealtorAdam Member

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    Alright, I got the Peterson all finished and back together! It may be the best smoking pipe I've ever smoked! As always, Suggestions/critiques are welcome! I had some trouble getting in the creases around the P-lip. It's not super noticeable though. The moisture reservoir in the Peterson System part was a B*tch to clean. I'm still not sure if I got everything out, but I finally decided it was good enough. :) I'm pretty sure the old owner didn't clean this pipe from the day he bought it. (Coincidentally his teeth marks match up with my teeth pretty well, so I didn't worry about the big dents.)
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  10. CavenFish

    CavenFish Active Member

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    Looks good.
     
  11. Hawkwood

    Hawkwood Member

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    Nice job on the Pete! Grain alcohol is essential for a grungy sump....
     
  12. User3940

    User3940 Active Member

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    Very nice job on the Pete.
     
  13. SidStavros

    SidStavros Member

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    You can put a band to fill the gap,an acrylic will do the job better than a metal one. If you don't want a band use a cone tool to make a "nest" in the briar so the tenon will fit very nice in there.
     
  14. Riff Raff

    Riff Raff Active Member

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    Nice work!

    On the A pipe: You can also heat the tenon in hot water, stick it immediately into the pipe and push it flush, hold till cooled. That gap is small enough it might work (I just did that with an Ashton that I've had for years, the gap really bugged me)

    For getting oxidation out of the button crease: Try wrapping your paper (2000 or so wet) around a flat popsicle stick and using it to get the crease clean. Make sure your stick is slighty angled towards the button so you don't cut a groove in the stem. I've also used a razor blade carefully scrape away oxidation in a crease, then sand smooth with paper. (proceed carefully with this method!)
     
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