NewB question: what can "Kentucky" tobacco mean?

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dmkerr

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#4
And "COLT"? I'm not sure where Cypriot comes from, although I've seen it used elsewhere. I take it to mean Cyprian latakia, that is, latakia from Cyprus rather than the traditional, and now hard to find, Syrian latakia.

Oriental and Turkish are pretty much interchangeable, although I have seen them differentiated as well. I suppose "oriental" could mean any Turkish-type tobacco that comes from a country other than Turkey (Greece, Russia, etc) but that's splitting hairs. I think most blenders use the terms Oriental and Turkish interchangeably.

But yeah, Southbound is right on with his description of Kentucky. It's definitely burley, but it's burley-er...er due to the fire curing.
 

#6
Does fire-cured burley have a higher nicotine content than the same tobacco air-cured?

So "Kentucky" may not be coming from Kentucky, it's rather how the burley is cured? I don't see the same distinction made, at least not as pointedly, for Virginia (air-cured vs fire or flue cured).

Yes, Cypriot is a synonym for Cyprian, for latakia from Cyprus (in the context I came across the term, anyway). Is Turkish tobacco not cured the same way as latakia?

Thanks for the patience. I'll soon have the training wheels off.

Lee
 

dmkerr

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#8
Does fire-cured burley have a higher nicotine content than the same tobacco air-cured?

So "Kentucky" may not be coming from Kentucky, it's rather how the burley is cured? I don't see the same distinction made, at least not as pointedly, for Virginia (air-cured vs fire or flue cured).

Yes, Cypriot is a synonym for Cyprian, for latakia from Cyprus (in the context I came across the term, anyway). Is Turkish tobacco not cured the same way as latakia?

Thanks for the patience. I'll soon have the training wheels off.

Lee
Burley's nic content is high enough. I don't know if Kentucky is higher.

Kentucky may not come from Kentucky, just as Virginia may not come from Virginia. It's the curing that distinguishes it from burley, as you stated. At least that is my understanding.

Turkish and latakia are cured differently, and latakia is made from a specific strain, whereas "Turkish" could be mean any or all of several strains.
 

leacha

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#9
I read an article a little while ago stating that Burley production is increasing in Kentucky and so is the "art" of fire curing it. So chances are if it states "Kentucky" leaf tobacco or what ever, you are probably getting the true stuff.
 

dmkerr

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#10
I read an article a little while ago stating that Burley production is increasing in Kentucky and so is the "art" of fire curing it. So chances are if it states "Kentucky" leaf tobacco or what ever, you are probably getting the true stuff.
While fire-curing burley is not new, you're right - it's going hogwild currently. People are really getting into what fire-curing does and how the end product is so different from the typical air cured burley. It's like an entirely different leaf.
 

glpease

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#12
I wrote a little about dark-fired here. There's more. There's always more. ;)

Not all Kentucky comes from, um, Kentucky. Some of it's grown in Virginia. Some isn't even grown in the US. Italy os one of the largest sources in Europe for dark-fired Kentucky tobacco. I know of at least one blending house "over there" using Italian leaf. (Personally, I find the US grown product more refined, more flavorful, more consistent; the Italian leaf is definitely stronger.)
 

dmkerr

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#13
Since you're here... any truth to the rumor that burley seed is the same as virginia seed but ends up different due to climate? Your post would indicate that not to be the case. Thanks.
 

#14
I wrote a little about dark-fired here. There's more. There's always more. ;)

Not all Kentucky comes from, um, Kentucky. Some of it's grown in Virginia. Some isn't even grown in the US. Italy os one of the largest sources in Europe for dark-fired Kentucky tobacco. I know of at least one blending house "over there" using Italian leaf. (Personally, I find the US grown product more refined, more flavorful, more consistent; the Italian leaf is definitely stronger.)
Thanks for the link. I hope you'll write that full article you say the subject of dark fired Kentucky tobacco could use. It sound like it has an interesting history.

I also see that both Virginia and burley now come from Africa, as well. Only occasionally is the actual country mentioned. Africa is a big place with a lot of different agricultural climates.
 

Wickwire

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#15
If you want to try it to see of you like like it, both Mac Baren Old Dark Fired and GL Pease Jack Knife Plug are pretty good representatives. I prefer it to Latakia, but that's just me. However, it is stronger in nicotine.
 

#16
I've got HH ODF on the way. I see it's available in both flake and ready rubbed form.

If plug tobacco enters the house, I am bound by deep memories to, at least once, cut a thick slice with a big hand-me-down Case pocketknife and chew it.

My grandfather, who half raised me, chewed Bloodhound. It came in flat squares, maybe 3"x3"x0.5". I remember him taking it out of his shirt pocket, big hands gentle with the cellophane, and pulling out that Case folder from his right trouser pocket to cut off a slice. He liked the chew after a long day of carpentry best of all, after he had carefully resharpened his handsaw with a file and that Case with a stone and spit, ready for the next day's work, now sitting on the back porch, letting the night surround him. I'd chatter like the kid I was for a few minutes, and then we'd sit together in silence for a half hour or more. I'm pushing 60 and I still miss PawPaw, gone these 40 years.
 

ruffinogold

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#17
I wouldnt doubt if the Kentucky type Burley is called Kentucky because thats probably where the process for making that type of Burley originated [ I'm guessing ] . Kentucky Burley is bad ass and I love it ! I think the best Kentucky Burley is that in the Peter Heinrichs Dark strong Flake ... it simply amazing !! The Va in it aint bad either .. lol
 

Wickwire

Member
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#19
I've got HH ODF on the way. I see it's available in both flake and ready rubbed form.

If plug tobacco enters the house, I am bound by deep memories to, at least once, cut a thick slice with a big hand-me-down Case pocketknife and chew it.

My grandfather, who half raised me, chewed Bloodhound. It came in flat squares, maybe 3"x3"x0.5". I remember him taking it out of his shirt pocket, big hands gentle with the cellophane, and pulling out that Case folder from his right trouser pocket to cut off a slice. He liked the chew after a long day of carpentry best of all, after he had carefully resharpened his handsaw with a file and that Case with a stone and spit, ready for the next day's work, now sitting on the back porch, letting the night surround him. I'd chatter like the kid I was for a few minutes, and then we'd sit together in silence for a half hour or more. I'm pushing 60 and I still miss PawPaw, gone these 40 years.
Jack Knife Comes in ready rubbed too, in case you don't feel like a chew. My grandfather chewed Redman. He thought it was hilarious when he gave me a chew and it made me sick. I miss him too.
 

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#20
Jack Knife Comes in ready rubbed too, in case you don't feel like a chew. My grandfather chewed Redman. He thought it was hilarious when he gave me a chew and it made me sick. I miss him too.
That's good to know, I'll give it a try. I wasn't looking forward to turning green. :) But it was a good memory.
 

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