NewB question: what can "Kentucky" tobacco mean?

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ruffinogold

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#21
How are perique and Kentucky tobaccos comparable?
Because Kentucky is heavier in flavor , it's being used as a Perique substitute and does a decent job .. but .. Perique is fermented out the whazoo and has more of a tang to it [ it 's absolutely nasty by itself .. I mean horrid ] . It's comparable in the " strength of flavor " factor . They taste different but are each strong and after all , they're both tobacco and I'd imagine theyre fermenting the Kentucky as well [ but not like them old guys from La. ] , so it works pretty good , say in the new Three Nuns blend ... it's as good as a non Perique can be ... so far , I think
 

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glpease

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#23
How are perique and Kentucky tobaccos comparable?
The real answer is that they're not. At all. They have completely different flavor and aroma profiles, and though some manufacturers are substituting perique with dark-fired in certain blends, the results are absolutely not like the originals.

Dark-fired is wonderful stuff, don't get me wrong. I love it, or I wouldn't be using it in so many blends. But, it's not a perique substitute. Dark-fired is almost perfumed, almost floral, with a deep, but delicate smokiness. Perique is stewed, fermented, tart, peppery, pungent, depending on how it's used, what it's blended with. They both make strong statements, but they're as different as Trotsky was from Stalin...
 

ruffinogold

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Mayor
#24
The real answer is that they're not. At all. They have completely different flavor and aroma profiles, and though some manufacturers are substituting perique with dark-fired in certain blends, the results are absolutely not like the originals.

Dark-fired is wonderful stuff, don't get me wrong. I love it, or I wouldn't be using it in so many blends. But, it's not a perique substitute. Dark-fired is almost perfumed, almost floral, with a deep, but delicate smokiness. Perique is stewed, fermented, tart, peppery, pungent, depending on how it's used, what it's blended with. They both make strong statements, but they're as different as Trotsky was from Stalin...

Interesting , you basically said exactly what I said above but you have the opposite view and your thoughts of Kentucky being Floral makes me realize why your blends have the descriptions they do . Surely , no one is saying Kentucky is Perique but if you or anybody was gonna substitute another tobacco for Perique , Kentucky is the best going , atm . In that regard , it's a substitute of Strength of a flavor
 

#26
I wrote a little about dark-fired here. There's more. There's always more. ;)

Not all Kentucky comes from, um, Kentucky. Some of it's grown in Virginia. Some isn't even grown in the US. Italy os one of the largest sources in Europe for dark-fired Kentucky tobacco. I know of at least one blending house "over there" using Italian leaf. (Personally, I find the US grown product more refined, more flavorful, more consistent; the Italian leaf is definitely stronger.)
Fire cured Kentucky tobacco is what goes into my favorite "Toscanello" cigarillos. The wrapper is from Virginia, but the filler is Italian. Its machine made and inexpensive but that's deceptive - its a very nice, unique, smoke. Its strong, woody, smokey - and its definitely what I'm looking for in pipe tobacco.

Here's some information on it for you guys who like Kentucky tobacco: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toscano_(cigar)

Does anyone have any good pipe blends to recommend for a similar experience?
 

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User4408

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#27
There are many, many different seed varieties, but only a few are used much. Truth is, everything has something to contribute to the final product - seed selection, growing conditions, agricultural management. Here's something I wrote last January.
Now THAT is what I call informative! Usually it's necessary to dig through Robert Winan's The Pipe Tobacco Book to get this kind of information. Gregory's short piece is much easier to understand, but also shows how complicated the subject is.

Early on I thought that "Virginia" was almost always bright in both color and flavor. He suggested I try Union Square which started to open my eyes to how varied this leaf can be. The varieties he uses in that are quite full-bodied, nutty, and cool ... almost like a highly-refined burley but still preserving all the charms of flue-cured leaf.

I've since discovered the occasional "brown" Virginia that turned out to be much higher in sugar than certain bright lemon varieties. In short, I no longer try to guess what a Virginia blend will taste like just by looking at it. That said, it's still a mystery how the USDA differentiates lemon, brown, orange, orange/red, and red Virginia. I used to assume they did it by coloration rather than stalk position, but that was only a wild guess.

Back on the subject of "Kentucky" tobacco: it would be nice to know about techniques for softening it such as the cavendish process. I assume this is what blenders like Mac Baren do with their dark-fired when they use maple sugar to lower the pH. One can really tell the difference when blowing it through the nose: the softened version is smooth and creamy, whereas normal untreated dark-fired is pretty sharp, even acrid.
 

hoss

Member
Member
#28
As a huge fan of both properly balanced perique blends and all the kentucky blends i can get my hands on, this was an interesting read. Now for a pipe!
 

#29
I've now got ODF and JackKnife in house, which have Kentucky in them.

Also I'm smoking Kendal Kentucky, which I really like. If I read correctly, KK is all or mostly Kentucky tobacco. Are there other blends similar to KK, with all-Kentucky or very high Kentucky content?
 

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