Opening night total loss

Discussion in 'Pipe Tobacco' started by blackdog, Aug 3, 2012.

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  1. blackdog

    blackdog Member

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    I bought a large tin of C&D opening night last year. Upon opening the other day the whole tin was green/white fuzzy and no tobacco to be seen! I realize s**t happens but damn when you are really looking forward to a smoke that sucks. Anyone else ever have this happen? And what if anything should I do in the future to stop this? None of my other tins have any sign of this and some I've had for several years.
     
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  2. David Emond

    David Emond Active Member

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    hmm thats funny. In my C&D there was 1 piece of green tobacco that I threw out. The rest of the tin seemed ok
     
  3. nesta

    nesta Well-Known Member

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    This happens once in a blue moon. Many people suggest cellaring long term in jars rather than the original tins for just this reason. Imagine saving that special tin of your favorite blend for 10+ years, saving it for a special occasion, only to find it unsmokeable when you get to it? At least with jars you can check on them periodically without opening them, you can see the condition the tobacco is in when you start aging it, and so on.

    That's all I can think of to prevent it from happening, and I don't do it. It's an extra expense, buying that many jars, and I'm honestly willing to take my chances. However, if it was me I'd try contacting the manufacturer and tell them what happened. I'd be willing to wager that if you sent them the tin in the mail they wouldn't just say "tough s***," they'd probably apologize and send you a new tin of a recent batch of the stuff. So of course it won't have any age on it, but you'd be able to smoke it.

    Anyway, of course I can't promise they'd replace it, but they're a fairly small business and want your business, and if the tin was moldy when you opened it it's because of the way it was tinned. They will understand that, and hopefully they'll want to make it right.
     
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  4. David Emond

    David Emond Active Member

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    Yeah, I open the tin and the tobacco goes right into a jar. Ill be investing more into C&D I love their English Chocolate and ill be trying out more of their stuff.
     
  5. blackdog

    blackdog Member

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    I will try to contact C&D but you are right this does happen, just happens to be my first time. Being sealed I figured I had no worries so it didnt even dawn on me to put it in a jar. Thats a good idea though to be able to check it out once and awhile but it always made me nervous to try it since my cat has a habit of nocking things on the floor.
     
  6. raf66

    raf66 Member

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    Ouch. That sucks. I tend to jar up a bunch of my newly-bought tobaccos, but I have a BUNCH of sealed tins (both round and square/rectangular) that I've never opened just to save for a "rainy day" some years hence. Most of them are blends that I have a bunch jarred already, and many of those are 2 years old +. No offense but I'm hoping I don't suffer the same fate.

    Not to hijack the thread, and maybe as an adjunct to the OP's post, would you guys suggest jarring up EVERY tobacco purchase rather than allowing some to age naturally in their original, unopened tins just to keep from having this problem?
     
  7. LifeOfRiley

    LifeOfRiley Member

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    I can think of five possible reasons to open tins immediately and jar everything (assuming the tins are in good shape):

    1) So you know if a tin was bad when you bought it and can get have an easier time getting your money back.
    2) So that you don't get caught on a trip or something with just that tin and no good ones to spare.
    3) If you detect the mold early, you might be able to salvage the rest of the blend.
    4) Moving from the tin to the jar will decrease the chance of mold.
    5) Stopping the aging process in the jar and starting another one in the tin will improve the tobacco more than straight tin-aging.

    1 & 2 seem reasonable. I'm more skeptical of 3, 4 & 5.
     
  8. zwolanek

    zwolanek Member

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    I vacuum my jars with "Pump-n-Seal." Nothing can grow in a vacuum. Another alternative is freezing, which is easiest in Minnesota.

    This is disconcerting news, though. I don't want to open all the tins I have. One of the advantages of keeping the tins is you can more easily trade them (it's very difficult to counterfeit a tin) and many have the factory date stamped or stuck on them.
     
  9. Old Codger

    Old Codger Active Member

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    Yes. I don't trust tins or plastic. Glass is the way to go.
     
  10. Sasquatch

    Sasquatch Sales Account

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    Funny how it never happens to McClelland or Mac Baren. Or Gawith. Or Gawith Hogarth. Or McConnel.

    Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm......

    This is a major reason I don't buy CD blends. I just don't trust the processing or packaging. Opened a ten year old tin of Pease..... bone dry. Better than rotted I guess.
     
  11. nesta

    nesta Well-Known Member

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    Someone did post on here a while ago about opening up an 8oz container of Penzance to find it moldy, fwiw
     
  12. blackdog

    blackdog Member

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    Just got an email back from Craig tarler at C&D, he was very helpful and said he will send me a new tin. Can't beat that customer service:)
     
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  13. MacNutz

    MacNutz Active Member

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    Glass is superior, no doubt about it. I have a dog that knocks things over all the time. The glass jars go into a drawer or cabinet or even boxes. That is the only way to protect them from a curious clumsy beast or wife. :) Of course, in my case I never have any long enough to need the jars but I use them anyway just to keep it from drying out before I burn it.
     
  14. AkBuba

    AkBuba Member

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    I'm new to this stuff... Can you tell me what type of jars you use? how big, do they actually seal, etc?
     
  15. Old Codger

    Old Codger Active Member

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    Bail top jars in whatever size is appropriate for longer term storage. Small widemouth mason jars for short term use. Also got some of these to try for small quantity daily use. http://www.ikea.com/ca/en/catalog/products/50081452/
     
  16. cakeanddottle

    cakeanddottle Member

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    That isn't practical for someone trying to make a cellar of any consequence. How many $3 jars would I need? I'd need $1000 worth of those jars.

    http://./images/cel4.jpg

    Besides, you can't beat the seal a widemouth mason jar provides. You are not going to lose any tobacco to a mason jar. If you get mold, the spores were on the tobacco when you jarred it. $9/flat at my grocery store for 16oz and 8oz jars.
     
  17. Old Codger

    Old Codger Active Member

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    I use a few of those little ikea jars just for tobacco that I'm currently smoking, not for longer term storage. They seem to work quite well for that purpose. Mason jars/bail tops for longer term storage.

    Nice collection!
     
  18. AkBuba

    AkBuba Member

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    Holy CRAP. I knew i was a beginner but i had NO IDEA how much of one!
     
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