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Please, what's best material for replacing white stem logo

Discussion in 'Repair, Maintenance & Restoration' started by olddog, Jan 9, 2014.

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  1. olddog

    olddog Member

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    Hello. I've been attempting to replace a missing white Dr. Grabow spade logo, and have tried a number of things with poor results, the last being a white epoxy paste. What is the best material to use in replacing white inset logos? Is there a plastic that can be softened and pressed, sanded, etc., or something else? Thanks in advance
     


  2. MikeInMaine

    MikeInMaine Passes for human

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    You could try a white paint marker.
     
  3. Spillproof

    Spillproof Mostly Harmless Moderator

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    Hardware store.
    Light switch face-plate ;-)

    A white one.
    And a black one.

    Have fun.
     
  4. beaupipe

    beaupipe Active Member

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    If it's a recent, still-in-production model, the factory has a replacement stem service. If I remember correctly, it's only about 11 or 12 bucks. And a lot less aggravation, I suspect.
     
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  5. woody

    woody Admin Admin

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    Polymer clay might work but it has to be heated to harden.
    http://www.amazon.com/Polyform-Sculpey-Original-Polymer-Clay/dp/B0016N6CMU
     
  6. olddog

    olddog Member

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    Thank you for the advice guys, and I'll probably try something along the lines of Woody's idea next if I can't find a white resin or polymer that will dry rock hard. (If it works, I should have enough left over to mail small amounts to whomever needs some for the same kind of project). A hard plastic would have been my first choice, but my peepers ain't what they used to me to do the fine shaping. The early Grabows had more oddly shaped spades unlike today's shape, which kind of eliminated the factory service on this particular pipe but I appreciate the suggestion. Thanks again.
     
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  7. SidStavros

    SidStavros Member

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    Smalt used in decoration can help,the problem is that you have to by the bottle and the catalyse together and to have the proper tool for applying.In jewellery supply stores they have all the colours and a jewel repairer can do it for you in one day. Another simply solution is an industrial marker,scratch softly the logo with something spicate and choose one marker with thin nose.
     
  8. Billy Ockham

    Billy Ockham Notice when you’re happy.

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    The easy fix is a white crayon. Rub it over the logo, it's soft enough to fill it in, but won't scratch anything. Just buff off surrounding area with a soft cloth.
     
    Bobby Stubbs likes this.
  9. Bobby Stubbs

    Bobby Stubbs Member

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    The white crayon works..
     
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