Pull top tins v/s screw on covers 'pancake' tins.

Discussion in 'The Smoking Lounge' started by Ol Brokedik, Nov 17, 2010.

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  1. Ol Brokedik

    Ol Brokedik Active Member

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    I know the round 'pancake' tins are vacuum sealed. This is why they're so hard to open. It looks like most of our domestic blenders have gone to the pull top tin. I believe I can trust a vacuum sealed tin to keep the product fresh for 5-10 years. There is a bit of air in the pull top tins. I'm comcerned about the quality of the tobacco that has been in a pull top tin for that same amount of time.
    Can anyone tell me if one type of tin is better than the other?
    Thanks!!
    Ol Brokedik.
     


  2. ruffinogold

    ruffinogold Ruffinogold-Mayor, I.R.G.E.--At Large. Mayor

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    I dont know which one is better but I dig the round metal ones . They are no doubt sealed . Jeez , you can hear the air rush out across a room ya know
     
  3. Ol Brokedik

    Ol Brokedik Active Member

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    Hi ruffinogold. I wish we could put a video together of pipers opening their first vacuum sealed tin. There would be some real comedy there!
     
  4. Puff The Magic

    Puff The Magic Active Member

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    There'd be the more clever of sorts making funny faces as the tin equalized like he/she was in a "Mongo" contest...............hey great idea for youtube!

    I'll watch but I'm too twisted to make a vid


    :velho:
    Ed Puff!
    Cogito ergo puff
     
  5. yinyang

    yinyang Some rim charring is to be expected.

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    I have no evidence either way, but I've had Vienna Sausages in a pull top can go way out of date, but they appeared fine. (The stray dogs loved them!...You didn't think I was gonna try 'em, didya? :) ) I would hazard that sealed is sealed...unless it's a confounded rectangular/square tin...one bump and it's a dust maker. I assume the pull lids hold their seal. The fact they have air trapped inside should assist aging, too, if I understand things right.
     
  6. GlassEye

    GlassEye Member

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    I would trust the pull-top tins more than the vac sealed variety. You know the pull-tops are sealed, the vacuum seal could have failed and you wouldn't easily be able to tell until you go to open it. Aging should be fine in either as long as it is sealed.
     
  7. jhe888

    jhe888 Member

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    The vacuum in a vacuum sealed can is a very low grade vacuum. There is still a good bit of air in there - if there weren't the atmosphere would crush that tin flat. Think of it more as a small pressure differential than a vacuum. I don't think there is much of a difference between those and the pull top tins.
     
  8. user0003

    user0003 Well-Known Member

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    +1

    Exactly correct.
     
  9. Ol Brokedik

    Ol Brokedik Active Member

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    Mucho Grats!
     
  10. jeffbee

    jeffbee Member

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    My concern with the pull-top "Pringles Can" type is that they are a paper tube lined with aluminum. If it were a solid metal can with rolled/crimped seams, it would likely outlast the smoker. But paper is not impermiable. The foil coats the paper, but then the paper is twisted into a tube, so even the aluminum foil has a spiral seam backed by cardboard. Seems like a really good filter, not a really good seal.

    Then again, the bigger challenge is keeping me from opening the tin in the car on the way home. :whistle:
     
  11. Bri2k

    Bri2k Active Member

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    I guess I've been lucky so far. All my "pull-top" tins are metal. If they switched to making the tins from cardboard, I don't think that bodes well for long-term storage.
     
  12. user0003

    user0003 Well-Known Member

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    All of the "pop top" C&D, McC and GLP tins I have ever had are all aluminum, not lined paper.
     
  13. GlassEye

    GlassEye Member

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    All of my pull top tins are solid metal with a crimped/rolled edge top that is all metal, the metal top is etched to peel open. C&D, GLP, McClellands use this type of tin. As you said, I suspect these could be dug up by archaeologists centuries later and still smoked, if they did not rust out. Paper cans don't seem like a great idea.

    It is difficult to refrain from popping open the tin as soon as it enters my hands, thats what jars are for :lol:
     
  14. jmiket91

    jmiket91 Member

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    +1 ...
     
  15. ruffinogold

    ruffinogold Ruffinogold-Mayor, I.R.G.E.--At Large. Mayor

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    I was 180 on my comment . The air rushes in when ya pop a round tin . I have yet to have one lame and I havent yet heard a pull top rush air in like a round metal tin . So far .
     
  16. jeffbee

    jeffbee Member

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    Okay. I just checked my cellar. McClelland and Cornell & Diehl are in all-metal time capsules. Only Sutliff appears to be using the "Pringles can".

    Had a square tin of SG Balkan Flake go flat on me. Took two weeks to rehydrate in a jar. Always tasted salty after that. Still good though.
     
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