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Rim Darkening

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nesta

Well-Known Member
Member
#1
Hey, we're all newbies some ways, right? Might not be new to the pipe but this is a "newby" question I suppose.

Basically....why, appart from aesthetics, should I give two squirrel farts about rim darkening?

I have some level of darkening apparent on all of my bowls pretty much. Is there a good way to remove it? I ask for vanity's sake.

Is there a good way to prevent it? I don't intentionally ever hold flame over the rims, I try to be careful, but it seems I inevitably end up with some darkening.

In the long run, is this in any way harmful to the pipe from a functional standpoint, or does it just look less beautiful than a pipe without it?
 

ruffinogold

Well-Known Member
Mayor
#2
I do general cleaning to my pipes often enough to where it dosent happen mostly ... but if it does .. I dont give a rats a** ..... Two squirrel farts .. maybe . Youre good to go as far as funcion .. no worries
 

nesta

Well-Known Member
Member
#3
What type of cleaning is good for removing it? Suppose there's rather heavy darkening - can this be fixed also?
 

ruffinogold

Well-Known Member
Mayor
#4
What type of cleaning is good for removing it? Suppose there's rather heavy darkening - can this be fixed also?
Hmmm ... I've got a baldor buffer so I'll win any time . I've known people to use toothpaste to work it off and theres probably 100 ways for the home remedy ... once ya get a buffer though , you'll forget everythinh else . Thy are worth their weight in ... cooper
 

Puff The Magic

Active Member
Member
#5
Caused by several things:

Windy lightups/relights

Overfill the bowl

Lack of maintenance

Or just plain ole good trapped essences! If it's not scorching and it's disolvable with moist cleaning, it's essences man! Dried albeit but that's the type of darkening ya want.

Some of my pipes are total "blackeye'd". Some scorched, most essences. I clean it off my nicer pipes but it's a badge of "that many smokes" given. It's a good thing!

Value is the culprit. Would you pay the same asking price for either of two identical pipes but one had sccorching? I wouldn't.

Ed
Puff
 

nesta

Well-Known Member
Member
#6
These pipes are for my enjoyment only. No plans to sell them at any point.

So I suppose I just won't worry as long as it doesn't hurt anything.

Still, it would be nice to be more easily avoided for me for when I get nicer pipes with a light or smooth finish
 

nesta

Well-Known Member
Member
#7
So I know that meerschaum tends to color as you smoke it as a result of the oils and other stuff in the smoke sort of soaking into the material and working their way outward. I've heard this can happen with briar too, but often to a lesser degree.

That said, I've noticed my Ben Wade billiard, while featuring a tan finish, has changed color a bit. It's getting darker and a bit redder in color in a few places. Especially the side of the bowl facing me when I smoke it and the top of the shank. I virtually never hold it by the shank, so I'm pretty sure it's not simply a result of smoking with dirty hands lol....

But I wouldn't expect it to darken so quickly. I've only had it a few months, and I smoke it plenty but have a few others I smoke a lot too. Any thoughts?
 

Puff The Magic

Active Member
Member
#8
Briars will stain as meers do but in their own briarly way. Usually the orientation of the grain will determine the deeper/darker coloring and where they'll end. Bottom line, it the pipe wants to color/darken, it will. You just have to help it along :)

Ed
Puff
 

Puff The Magic

Active Member
Member
#10
Also, you'll char or have a tendency to char the rim if you done take the flame straight into the bowl on lights/relights. I blame "Heir Frank" for this bit of technique. ;)

Ed
Puff
 

Mister Moo

Gone but not forgotten
Staff member
Member
#13
Wipe rim each post-smoke with spit on a paper napkin; some folks use baby wipes. They'll stay clean. Regular wax applications help a bit if you're on the OCD side.
 

jpberg

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
#16
Are you talking about tar/tobacco related stuff, or rim charring? If the latter, the simple fix is to not set your rim on fire.
Kidding aside, if you want to remove a large build up of tar/stuff, jam some cottonballs in your bowl ( to just below the rim), and get your teakettle whistling, and carefully run your rim over the escaping steam. You'll get the feel for the timing, it's pretty much common sense. You'll want a good cotton cloth to wipe with as you go, paper towels and napkins don't stand up.
 

SmokeyJoe

Active Member
Member
#17
Are you talking about tar/tobacco related stuff, or rim charring? If the latter, the simple fix is to not set your rim on fire.
Kidding aside, if you want to remove a large build up of tar/stuff, jam some cottonballs in your bowl ( to just below the rim), and get your teakettle whistling, and carefully run your rim over the escaping steam. You'll get the feel for the timing, it's pretty much common sense. You'll want a good cotton cloth to wipe with as you go, paper towels and napkins don't stand up.
That's a great tip! So I don't have to scrub away with a dozen q-tips to clean the rim ??
Wait, I don't have a tea kettle....:doh:
 

jhe888

Member
Member
#18
To remove blackening from smoke or other goo, first try spit on a cloth and apply some elbow grease. Spit seems to be the best at this. (Alcohol would work, too, but would also remove the finish.) If that doesn't work, try steam, as described above. If you rub it off after each smoke, it won't build up.
 

1stGenRex

Member
Member
#19
To remove blackening from smoke or other goo, first try spit on a cloth and apply some elbow grease. Spit seems to be the best at this. (Alcohol would work, too, but would also remove the finish.) If that doesn't work, try steam, as described above. If you rub it off after each smoke, it won't build up.
I just tried this but in a different way. Slobber up your finger, and work it around the rim (ugh that sounds pretty bad, but bear with me) for a couple minutes. Then take your cloth, and wipe it off. I just cleaned up an estate Pete like that. I was surprised at how much blackening I was able to get off of the thing!
 
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