Saving super dry tobacco

Discussion in 'Pipe Tobacco' started by Nuck81, Oct 31, 2011.

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  1. Puff The Magic

    Puff The Magic Active Member

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    I rehyd leaf by putting it in a glass jar and wet the clay disc in the top of the lid and let the leaf rehyd slowly.

    If you don't have that gizmo, then a bowl with a clean paper towel (moistened) and placed over the top. Use plastic wrap then a rubber band or foil to hold it in place and keep the moisture from going out but rather into your desiccated leaf.

    May take a few moistenings depending on how crispy the leaf was and how moist you like it.

    Ed
    Puff
     


  2. Glenn

    Glenn Active Member

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    I have a rehydration method that works great for me. I'll take a tin or bag or tobacco and open it up. I put that in a gallon ziplock bag. I wet down a paper towel and fold it a couple of times and then put that in the bag. Not over or on on in the tobacco, just in the gallon bag. Then I seal the bag up, I don't press out the extra air or anything like that. I just seal it up. Place in a warm place and let it sit a day. Check the tobacco. If still too dry let it sit another day. I have gotten excellent results doing this and most times I end up with perfectly rehydrated tobacco in a day. It works like a charm.
     
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  3. Puff The Magic

    Puff The Magic Active Member

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    Great method Glenn! Can do that on a car dashboard I'd bet!

    Ed
    Puff
     
  4. Nuck81

    Nuck81 Member

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    I used the paper towel over the bowl trick for about six hours today. Worked like a champ. Thanks for all the help!!
     
  5. el guero

    el guero Member

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    Glad to here it worked!
     
  6. SmokeyJoe

    SmokeyJoe Active Member

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    I tried a little re-hydration experiment a month ago, with an ounce or so of Balkan Sasieni obtained in a trade. It was dry when I received it and continued to dry out for another month or two until I opened the bag to find it on the crispy side.

    So I stole a container from the kitchen, a Gladware 64 oz / 1.9 L , so I could spread the leaf out, and have room for my trusty hygrometer, borrowed from my cigar cabinet. I wet a paper towel, damp but not dripping, and spread it over the bowl and sealed it with the lid
    [​IMG]

    The ambient temp and humidity on the eve of the experiment can be seen here: 37% humidity
    [​IMG]

    18 hours later: 87% humidity. The paper towel outside the container was completely dry while the part inside was still lightly damp.
    [​IMG]
    As shown here, the humidity was raised 50 points in 18 hours, and the leaf was soft and pliable to the touch. And the tobacco, when I smoked it that day, to my limited palate, tasted just like Balkan Sasieni. I have since re-hydrated 2 other tobaccos with the same results.
     
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  7. dmkerr

    dmkerr PG- free since '83! Moderator

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    Fruit starts its natural rotting process as soon as it's picked. An apple slice begins to rot rather quickly once the skin is removed (when it's sliced). This rotting process produces mold spores, and those spores may not only infect your tobacco, but also the container in which its in. If you toss it in a nice tobacco jar, you'll have to sterilize the jar once the mold takes over. You can't just wash it in the sink, as those invisible little spores will still be there. The tobacco, of course, should be tossed out.

    Lots of people have used this method with no ill effects. On the other hand, lots of people have experienced mold and lost some nice tobacco. It's very risky.
     
  8. jpberg

    jpberg Moderator Moderator

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    That's me, living on the edge.
     
  9. whitebriar

    whitebriar Member

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    same here--last several pouches have been crackley dry--
     
  10. jhe888

    jhe888 Member

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    You may not have meant this, but someone may take it the wrong way.

    Rotting doesn't produce mold spores. Rather, mold spores are floating around all the time. They can land on a piece of cut fruit and start to grow, and they could land on your tobacco and start to grow even without a piece of fruit. I have the feeling that tobacco may have some anti-mold properties, and it often isn't wet enough to support mold, either. I do agree that keeping a piece of fruit in it can up the risk.
     
  11. Glenn

    Glenn Active Member

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    Me too, I use tap water for rehydration. On the edge...
     
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