Slice of the south

Discussion in 'Pipe Tobacco' started by TedVig, Dec 13, 2011.

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  1. user0003

    user0003 Well-Known Member

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    Maybe you could find some Kale.
     


  2. IrishRover

    IrishRover Active Member

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    OH wow.. forgot all about that.. gees I should have never moved away..
     
  3. user0003

    user0003 Well-Known Member

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    Guess I shouldn't bring up pit BBQ.....................:whis:
     
  4. Elwin

    Elwin Member

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    What are you guys talking about? So far everything you've listed I can get at the local grocery store. What's the big deal - doesn't everybody carry these?
    Oh, and every spring fresh picked morel mushrooms.

    (And if you're waiting for a 'smilie', you need to move to the Ozarks of Missouri. Really...)



    OK, just one smilie.
    :p:
     
  5. user0003

    user0003 Well-Known Member

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    Rub it in...rub it in....:p:
     
  6. MacNutz

    MacNutz Active Member

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    Ha, I live in Canada and getting a lot of the things I like/want can be very difficult up here. I like introducing Canadians to real southern food. They even mess up the corn bread around here. Very sweet with a cake like texture. Ugh. That was a huge disappointment the first time I tried it. One year I brought a huge platter of fried green tomatoes and real cornbread to a Thanksgiving dinner. Both disappeared instantly and I was a hero. Well, for a few minutes.

    They love every southern thing I make, except for grits. I think you have to be born with grits to like them. Canadians think they should be sweet, like cream of wheat.

    Hell, I can't even find salt pork up here anymore. Fortunately catfish has become chic.

    Funny how things change. At one time, lobster was considered strictly poor people food. In the maritimes, a pile of lobster shells near the house was a sure sign of a low class impoverished abode. If you are Jewish, it is still an "abomination" to eat shell fish.
     
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  7. user0003

    user0003 Well-Known Member

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    Keep up the good fight, MN!
    :th1:

    I'm almost afraid to ask, what they do to Fried Chicken and Biscuits?
     
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  8. TedVig

    TedVig total pipeflake

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    Alright so... awesome southern food items aside, I called down there and they said they get it from Altadis. I asked what Altadis calls it and he said, "Slice of the South." Can't find it anywhere on their website. Maybe they distribute it? Oh well. Nice VA Flake long cut and "rolled up" in the jar.
     
  9. MacNutz

    MacNutz Active Member

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    Thanks Ted. I do get carried away sometimes on the topic of food.

    Jesla: Bisquits come in a can and chicken they bore to death.
     
  10. TedVig

    TedVig total pipeflake

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    Believe me - I had some cornbread, greens and yams with smoked turkey the other day. Love all that stuff!
     
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