The Thermodynamics of Pipe Smoking

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Mike

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#6
so just out of curiousity, has anyone tried this and compared the taste difference between a match and a lighter. i immediatly tried after reading this article and noticed a good bit more flavor when lighting with a match
 

Oglethorpe

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#7
Mike said:
so just out of curiousity, has anyone tried this and compared the taste difference between a match and a lighter. i immediatly tried after reading this article and noticed a good bit more flavor when lighting with a match
I think the author of that article leaves out one glaringly important point. What does any of this have to do with the smoking of the pipe after the flame is removed from the tobacco? He is insinuating that the "combustion zone" of the pipe retains the heat of a butane flame versus a match flame. I find that incredibly hard to believe/understand.
 

Mike

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#8
i think what he's trying to say is the initial effects of lighting with a hotter flame may kill some of the flavor or mask it with a more burnt taste. I guess i could have explained a little more of what i was talking about in my earlier post with more flavor. When using a match to light the tobacco, I get more taste from the light itself, but after the flame is taken away its the same either way. Don't know if any of this makes sense, so...:bing:
 

Oglethorpe

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#9
Mike said:
i think what he's trying to say is the initial effects of lighting with a hotter flame may kill some of the flavor or mask it with a more burnt taste. I guess i could have explained a little more of what i was talking about in my earlier post with more flavor. When using a match to light the tobacco, I get more taste from the light itself, but after the flame is taken away its the same either way. Don't know if any of this makes sense, so...:bing:
Mike... I wasn't really directing my comment at you per se, more at the author, but I'd agree with what you're saying here. Sure it may start out hot but there's now way the effect of the initial light lasts beyond the initial light.

Cheers!
 

piper

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#11
Oglethorpe said:
Mike... I wasn't really directing my comment at you per se, more at the author, but I'd agree with what you're saying here. Sure it may start out hot but there's now way the effect of the initial light lasts beyond the initial light.
Depends, in theory, as the "overheated" smoke is drawn through the rest of the tobacco, it could permanently color the flavor for the rest of the bowl.

His theory is definitely consistent, the only problem I see is that it's hard to verify. Flavor is subtle and subjective.
 
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