Tobacco au naturale...?

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jimmyblues

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#1
Hi gennelmen (and laydees?:cfsd:)

Apologies if this has been asked before...
but does anyone know of any commercial baccy produced which is completely free of any additives? i know that most baccy has some form of chemicals added, whether for flavouring, igniters, preservatives etc? Is there any that doesn't? completely natural, naked, as nature intended etc?:sh:

Thanks in advance:)

jdc
 

HCraven

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#2
I'm not really sure if there are any being produced right now that don't have some sort of additive, be it casing, top dressing, humectant, etc. I don't worry too much about most of these things, as even what I consider a natural, full tobacco flavor is invariably influenced by casing and other processes. Mac Baren has a good series of articles on production of pipe tobacco, including casing and topping, here. Speaking of Mac Baren, they did have a blend called "Only Tobacco" that was something like you described, but it suffered from poor sales and even poorer reviews, and thus has been discontinued.

I do tend to avoid those tobaccos that contain high levels of Propylene Glycol (a humectant), which includes most bulk aromatics, as they have to maintain moisture under adverse conditions lest they lose flavor. I also avoid aromatics with unnatural flavors. Heck, who am I kidding? I pretty much avoid aromatics altogether. But that's just me.

Happy Smoking!

Herb
 

Mister Moo

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#5
C&D makes a blend called Organic Pipe Dreams, it's certified organic, I don't know if that helps.
Not exactly au natural, it was topped with vanilla, prune- and agave juice and I don't know what else; think it's out of production. It was a lovely blend to look at and I thought it was a nice smoke. I presume many others did not. See more at http://www.organic-smoke.com/
 

jimmyblues

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#7
Thanks for all the responses chaps. part of me wondering how 'pure' tobaco would taste and burn, part of me thinks of the relative health benefits of not ingesting chemicals, and part of me curious to see how baccy would have been centuries ago before mas production etc.

will check out the Union Square and the Belgian Semois, if i can find them!

thanks again
 

HCraven

Active Member
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#10
Well, if you want to find out what tobacco was like centuries ago, pick up a tin of Sam Gawith's 1792 Flake. I don't think they've changed it since it's introduction in (yes) 1792. They're still using the same machinery they used back then too.
 

Mister Moo

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#11
Belgian 'Semois' - for one.
OT
Good suggestion, that.

Ji'blues -
Good news: I have some - if you are in the USA send me a stamped self-addressed envelope and I'll return a few bowls you can try
Bad news: you can't much compare semois to any other tobacco or blend on the planet.
 

Snake

permanent ankle biter
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#12
Pease's Union Square has no added casing or chemicals, just diestill ed water to moisten it. Only one I know of.
I also think Jack Knife Plug (Pease) is
natural. It seems very much so for me.

Jimmy, PM me if you're interested in
some Union Square, I'll send you a
sealed tin. From one bloke to another. ;)
 
#14
To answer your question, I would say probably not--unless you grow your own or know a tobacco farmer. A couple of years ago, I was poking around on the C&D website where they claimed that the only "additives" (that is other than flavorings) they used in their tobacco was distilled water and a "food-grade fungicide as required by the FDA." I don't know what this fungicide is, if its natural or chemical, if its required by all tobacco sold in the US, or just US manufacturers, or US manufacturers of a certain size, or even if its still a requirement, etc. Thought I'd put that out there to help aid your search. I'm sure if you contacted C&D, they'd be forthcoming about what they use, why they use it, and would have some tobacco recommendations for you.
 
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