Tobacco Growing Basics?

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#2
What are some tobacco growing basics that a new grower needs to know?
My family has been growing Burley since 1947. Would 1 or 2 of you like some "organically grown" Burley...from my farm in NC? Sign up quickly, it'll be "on the ground" next week, and I need to know what to "save back". I always saved some for my friends at the DGCF. It's sold to Santa Fe tobacco for cigarettes otherwise. Red Burley is Wonderful in a pipe. Anyone? PM please, first come, first served....ted
 
#6
Rugby and Yin...All I need is addresses. The burley is cut next week, hung, and air cured till October. Hopefully the weather will co-operate and I can, as last year, send it to you in early November, before we go to Florida. If not, it'll cure in the barn till April....ted
 
#7
Does anyone how if it is legal for me to grow a few plants in Indiana foe personal use?
If not could anyone tell me where I might be able to find out?
 
#8
My family has been growing Burley since 1947. Would 1 or 2 of you like some "organically grown" Burley...from my farm in NC? Sign up quickly, it'll be "on the ground" next week, and I need to know what to "save back". I always saved some for my friends at the DGCF. It's sold to Santa Fe tobacco for cigarettes otherwise. Red Burley is Wonderful in a pipe. Anyone? PM please, first come, first served....ted
Ted, I didn't see a way to PM you; as such, is it because you got too many PM's for the offer above? I'm in Fort Worth, TX and don't know if it would even grow here
 
#11
Okay, at the risk of sounding totally ignorant (b/c I am and why I'm asking): since the tobacco plants I'm looking at are self-pollinating and have to be either up to a mile apart (or counter cross-pollinating measures must be done ?) is there a "best tobacco plant" to buy? I don't have much yard at all unfortunately. Does this mean I'll need to grow a Burley one year, a Perique the next etc?
 

bosun

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#12
Okay, at the risk of sounding totally ignorant (b/c I am and why I'm asking): since the tobacco plants I'm looking at are self-pollinating and have to be either up to a mile apart (or counter cross-pollinating measures must be done ?) is there a "best tobacco plant" to buy? I don't have much yard at all unfortunately. Does this mean I'll need to grow a Burley one year, a Perique the next etc?
You buy a variety of seeds and they should give a crop of that variety. As the plant grows you have to pick off the flowers so they don't waste their energy on seeds instead of leaves. If you want to save seeds for next year then you have to bag the flowers as they come to maturity. I've never grown tobacco so am just saying what I've read. Hopefully an expert will correct me if I'm wrong!
 
#13
What type of tobacco do you prefer to smoke? Burley?, Turkish or maybe a Virginia?. Buy the seeds for the tobacco you like. If you grow several different varieties and want to save the seed you would simple put a bag over the seed head before it blossoms. The bags can be made of Agribon fabric, the stuff people use as floating row covers or you can get Organza bags like I do. These are the bags that bride's use for weddings and such.. they are nearly indestructible. Plant your tobacco plants 3 feet apart unless they are Turkish, you can plant those at 12 inches apart.
 
#15
What type of tobacco do you prefer to smoke? Burley?, Turkish or maybe a Virginia?. Buy the seeds for the tobacco you like. If you grow several different varieties and want to save the seed you would simple put a bag over the seed head before it blossoms. The bags can be made of Agribon fabric, the stuff people use as floating row covers or you can get Organza bags like I do. These are the bags that bride's use for weddings and such.. they are nearly indestructible. Plant your tobacco plants 3 feet apart unless they are Turkish, you can plant those at 12 inches apart.
VA's, VaPer's, VaBur's and I like a little latakia thrown in. Understand about the flowers/seeds and I've done a lot of reading about process from seed to final transplant outside; however, the part I'm really worried about is harvesting/fermenting/flavoring(if at all)/cutting/basically finishing out the leaf in prep to put it in a pipe and smoke.
 
#16
In a nutshell.. Plant your seeds about 8 weeks before you plan to set them out. Put the seeds on top of the soil, most tobacco seed needs light to germinate. Plant 3 feet apart . Be vigilant for slugs and cutworms. I use Sluggo and Diatomaceous Earth for their control. At roughly 50-60 days after you set them out they will form flower buds. If you are going to save seeds you need to bag them at this point. If not you can either snip off the bud head with your fingers or let them grow. Snipping the bud head will allow the leaf to grow bigger and thicker. After your tobacco has flowered ( or about a week after you saw a bud head) wait 3 weeks and then start harvesting. You can prime or stalk harvest the leaves. I've done it both ways and you really cannot tell the difference, although there are purists out there that swear you need to prime cigar leaf etc. Assuming you are going to stalk harvest just cut the stalk at the base of the plant and hang the entire plant upside down in an enclosed structure. Inspect every few days. It is somewhat of an art but you need to make sure your enclosed building is not too humid or the leaves will get moldy or too dry or your leaf will cure green and be worthless. I used to cure about 20 plants in my basement with great success. After you hang the plants it will take roughly 6 weeks for them to be cured. Now comes the hard part, for most tobaccos you need to let them age for a year before they are smokeable. Some exceptions to this rule are: Yellow Twist Bud ( a Burley), Big Gem ( a flue cured-Virginia type) and some Turkish varieties- these can be smoked after they are cured. You can also speed up the aging process by building a kiln. This is just a box that you put your tobacco in and control the temp and humidity. This process takes about 4 weeks after which your tobacco is nice and mellow.

Perique is easy to make: Take your harvested leaves and as they start to turn brown ( about 2 weeks-roughly) put them in a box and apply pressure to the box. I use my 20 ton shop press for the job. Every few days you take the tobacco out, fluff it up and re-press. It is ready in about 6 weeks although the pros will let it press for up to a year. You can use any type of tobacco, I've used Perique and also Havana 263.
 
#17
In a nutshell.. Plant your seeds about 8 weeks before you plan to set them out. Put the seeds on top of the soil, most tobacco seed needs light to germinate. Plant 3 feet apart . Be vigilant for slugs and cutworms. I use Sluggo and Diatomaceous Earth for their control. At roughly 50-60 days after you set them out they will form flower buds. If you are going to save seeds you need to bag them at this point. If not you can either snip off the bud head with your fingers or let them grow. Snipping the bud head will allow the leaf to grow bigger and thicker. After your tobacco has flowered ( or about a week after you saw a bud head) wait 3 weeks and then start harvesting. You can prime or stalk harvest the leaves. I've done it both ways and you really cannot tell the difference, although there are purists out there that swear you need to prime cigar leaf etc. Assuming you are going to stalk harvest just cut the stalk at the base of the plant and hang the entire plant upside down in an enclosed structure. Inspect every few days. It is somewhat of an art but you need to make sure your enclosed building is not too humid or the leaves will get moldy or too dry or your leaf will cure green and be worthless. I used to cure about 20 plants in my basement with great success. After you hang the plants it will take roughly 6 weeks for them to be cured. Now comes the hard part, for most tobaccos you need to let them age for a year before they are smokeable. Some exceptions to this rule are: Yellow Twist Bud ( a Burley), Big Gem ( a flue cured-Virginia type) and some Turkish varieties- these can be smoked after they are cured. You can also speed up the aging process by building a kiln. This is just a box that you put your tobacco in and control the temp and humidity. This process takes about 4 weeks after which your tobacco is nice and mellow.

Perique is easy to make: Take your harvested leaves and as they start to turn brown ( about 2 weeks-roughly) put them in a box and apply pressure to the box. I use my 20 ton shop press for the job. Every few days you take the tobacco out, fluff it up and re-press. It is ready in about 6 weeks although the pros will let it press for up to a year. You can use any type of tobacco, I've used Perique and also Havana 263.
Thank you!! Very helpful "nut shell" for sure."
 
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